Canada national rugby union team

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search
Canada
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Canucks, Les Rouges
Emblem Maple leaf
Union Rugby Canada
Head coach Mark Anscombe
Captain Hubert Buydens
Most caps Al Charron (76)
Top scorer James Pritchard (607)
Top try scorer Winston Stanley (24)
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current 19 (as of 15 February 2016)
Highest 12 (2011)
Lowest 19 (2016)
First international
Japan 9–8 Canada
(31 January 1932)
Biggest win
Barbados 3–71 Canada
(24 June 2006)
Biggest defeat
England 70–0 Canada
(13 November 2004)
World Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1987)
Best result Quarter-finals, 1991
Website www.rugbycanada.ca

The Canada national rugby union team represents Canada in international rugby union. They are governed by Rugby Canada, and play in red and white. Canada is classified by the International Rugby Board (IRB) as a tier two rugby nation. There are ten tier one nations, and eight tier two nations. Canada competes in competitions such as the Pacific Nations Cup and the Rugby World Cup.

Canada has been playing international rugby since the early 1930s, making their debut in 1932 against Japan. Canada have competed at every World Cup since the tournament was first staged in 1987, the only North American team to do so. Canada achieved their best result at the World Cup in 1991, where they reached the quarter-finals. Canada is a dominant power of North American rugby and currently ranks third in the Americas after Argentina and the USA. The team has achieved victories over traditionally stronger Six Nations teams such as France, Wales, Italy, and Scotland on at least one occasion in past years. Canada is currently ranked 18th in the IRB World Rankings.

In 2013, Canada joined the IRB Pacific Nations Cup, playing matches against Fiji, Tonga, Japan and neighbouring Tier 2 team USA.[1]

History

Early years

In 1874 the first North American international game took place in Cambridge, Massachusetts between McGill and Harvard universities. Later that same year a second game was played, but this time Harvard were the hosts, and the game was played with early "American Football" rules. Today, in carrying on the oldest annual sporting competition in North America, McGill University and Harvard University continue the tradition of competing for the Covo Cup, at alternating venues each November, using the original rules of rugby football. McGill University can therefore lay claim to being the oldest rugby club in Canada, but due to rugby's popularity among students and the McGill University Rugby Football Club's affiliation with the university, the claim as the oldest independent rugby club goes to the still active Westmount Rugby Football Club.

A Canadian Rugby Football Union was established in 1884, although this organisation went on to become the Canadian Football League, as rugby football in Canada evolved into Canadian football. In 1902–1903 the first Canadian team toured Britain. In 1909, Earl Grey, then Governor General of Canada, donated a trophy to the CRU to be awarded for the Rugby Football Championship of Canada. This trophy became known as the Grey Cup. However the rules used in Canada were vastly different from the rules used in countries that were part of the IRB. In the years that followed, the CRU would legalise forward passing and make other changes that would make Canadian football a totally different sport, similar to American football.

Post-World War I

During World War I and II rugby union was suspended but in the inter-war period there was something of a renaissance. In 1919 a Canadian Services team played overseas against representatives from England, New Zealand, South Africa and Australia. The formation of the Rugby Union of Canada took place in 1929 and this was followed by a tour of Japan by a Canadian representative side in 1932 to help foster trade between the two countries. About half the team were Canadian born (mostly British Columbia players) and the rest were originally from Britain. They lost 9–8 and 38–5 in the two test matches.

The original Canadian Rugby Union disbanded just before World War I. Canada's team to the United Kingdom in 1962 was dominated by British Columbia players. The Rugby Union of Canada was re-formed in 1965 as the Canadian Rugby Union. The 1966 British Lions played a non-cap match in Toronto on their way back from Australia and New Zealand, a match they won 19–8. Canada established themselves as the strongest team in North America, though they struggled to compete with the major test-playing nations in Europe and the Southern Hemisphere.

Modern era

Canadian rugby team

Canada were one of the 16 nations that were invited by the International Rugby Board (IRB) to compete at the inaugural Rugby World Cup in 1987, hosted by both Australia and New Zealand. Canada were grouped with Wales, Ireland and Tonga in Pool 2. In their first ever World Cup match they defeated Tonga 37–4. However they lost their subsequent matches 46–19 to Ireland and 40–9 to Wales, and finished third in the pool (not advancing to the finals).

Canada had to qualify for the 1991 Rugby World Cup. Canada took part in the Americas tournaments, and finished first in the Americas qualifying standings. At the 1991 Rugby World Cup, Canada was placed into Pool D, alongside France, Romania and Fiji. Canada beat Fiji and Romania but lost their fixture against France 19–13 to finish second in the pool, advancing to the quarter-finals. They were then knocked out in the quarter-final by the All Blacks, 29–13. The 1991 tournament stands as Canada's best ever finish in a Rugby World Cup.

Canada beat Wales 26–24 on November 10, 1993 at Cardiff Arms Park; and beat France 18–16 on June 4, 1994 at Twin Elms Rugby Park in Nepean, Ontario; and battled to a 27–27 draw against Ireland on 27 June 2000 at Markham, Ontario; and chalked up a 26–23 win against Scotland in Vancouver, British Columbia on June 15, 2002. The win over Scotland was the start of a streak of seven victories before losing to Wales in Cardiff.

Canada has never beaten England in six games, but has played their national XV, B team, and Under 23 teams eleven times (for which Canada awarded its players international caps.) The most notable result was a 15–12 victory over a strong England XV on 29 May 1993 at Swangard Stadium in Burnaby. Unfortunately for the Canadians, on the eve of the match England's management chose not to award international caps (due to fact that some players were touring with the British and Irish Lions in New Zealand at the time.) Additionally, before defeating Scotland proper in 2002, Canada beat Scotland XV 24–19 on May 25, 1991 at Saint John, New Brunswick.

As they were quarter finalists in 1991, they automatically qualified for the 1995 Rugby World Cup. They were in Pool A with the hosts South Africa, defending champions Australia, and Romania. Canada finished third in the pool, winning their match against Romania but losing 27–11 to Australia and 20–0 to the Springboks.

Canada won the now defunct Pacific Rim tournament three years in succession in 1996, 1997 and 1998.

Canada finished second in Round 4 of the Americas 1999 Rugby World Cup qualifying, losing only to Argentina, and qualify for the World Cup. Canada finished third in their pool (with France, Fiji and Namibia), winning their match against Namibia but losing their other two fixtures. The victory against Namibia was uncharacteristic for Canada, as they ran the score up to 72–11, one of their most lopsided victories, as there was a very slight statistical chance that they could have advanced on points scored. This trashing was the one bright light in an otherwise gloomy and disappointing 1999 World Cup performance.

Like all second- and third-tier nations, the Canadians have had problems having these players available for important games. As a consequence Canada has slipped out of the top 10 rugby union nations, but has nevertheless provided top class players such as Dan Baugh, Rod Snow, Mike James, Colin Yukes, Dave Lougheed and Jamie Cudmore to teams in England, Wales and France. The Canadians qualified for the 2003 Rugby World Cup in Australia.

Canada qualified as Americas 1, finishing at the top of Round 4 Americas tournaments, winning five of their six fixtures to enter the 2003 World Cup in Australia, their fifth world cup in a row. Canada's sole win was a 24–7 result against Tonga as they lost their games against Italy, Wales and the All Blacks.

Since 2003 Canada has played host to the Churchill Cup, making the final in 2010 but losing to the England Saxons 38–18. In 2004 and 2005 they replaced China in the Super Powers Cup. For the 2004 Superpowers Cup, Canada was substituted for China. In 2005 the competition was renamed the Super Cup. Canada beat Japan 15–10 in the final.

In 2006 Canada completed the qualification process for the 2007 Rugby World Cup. They were in a three-team group also containing Barbados and the United States. Each played the other once. On 24 June 2006, Canada defeated Barbados 71–3, in Bridgetown, their largest ever win.[2] Canada achieved a record win over the USA in the match in Newfoundland on August 12, 2006, defeating the USA 56–7 in front of a capacity crowd, when player James Pritchard scored a national record 36 points with three tries, six conversions and three penalties in the match, beating the record of 29 he had set against Barbados in their previous match.[3] The win assured Canada of a place in the 2007 World Cup as Americas 2 in Pool B.[4] Also that year, a Canadian team won the NA4 and the national team beat the US earlier in the Churchill Cup.

2007 World Cup

Canadian team after a pool stage match during the 2007 World Cup
Canada take on Wales during the 2007 World Cup
Canadian fans at the 2007 World Cup

Going into the World Cup Canada were ranked as severe outsiders, and given odds of 5000/1 to win the tournament.[5] Pool B also contained Australia, Fiji, Japan and Wales. In their opening match in Nantes on 9 September the Canadians lost 42–17 to Wales.[6] They followed this with a 29–16 loss to Fiji, whom they had needed to beat to have realistic hopes of progressing to the Quarter Finals.[7] They drew 12–12 with Japan in Bordeaux, conceding an injury-time try by Koji Taira.[8] In their final game they lost 37–6 to an Australian side consisting mostly of second-string players.[9] It meant they finished bottom of Pool B, and returned home from a World Cup without winning a single game for the first time ever.

The Kieran Crowley Era

Following the 2007 Rugby World Cup a new epoch in Canadian rugby began with the installation of Kieran Crowley as head coach of the men's national team. By April 2008 the former New Zealand All Black took over coaching duties with aspirations to positively shape the Canadian rugby psyche and improve upon recent results.[10]

In Autumn 2008 the Canadians toured Europe, beating Portugal in their opening match, but suffering heavy defeats in their subsequent games in Ireland, Wales and Scotland. In 2009 the Canadians will host a tour by the Welsh and Irish.[11]

Canada beat the United States in a two-legged playoff game in July 2009 to qualify for the 2011 Rugby World Cup in New Zealand and enter the tournament as Americas 1.[12] Canada began its Rugby World Cup preparations well, by finishing runner-up in the 2011 Churchill Cup for the second year in a row, losing 37–6 in the final to the England Saxons (England's second-string side).

This good form carried on in a two-legged home and away series of warm-up matches against the USA Eagles. In the home leg on August 6 at the BMO Stadium, Canada secured a 28–22 victory in front a record 10,621 fans. In the away leg played on August 13 at Colorado, Canada won 27–7. Their warm-up schedule continued with a match against the Australian Barbarians on August 26, featuring several of Australia's World Cup squad, including Berrick Barnes, Drew Mitchell and Rob Horne. Despite a strong performance, particularly by the Canadian pack, the Barbarians claimed a comfortable 38–14 victory. The Canadians played their final warm-up game on August 30, beating a representative Queensland Reds side 33–14.

2011 Rugby World Cup

The Canadians began their 2011 Rugby World Cup on September 14 against Tonga, winning 25–20. They followed this up with a 46–19 loss to France on September 18. The team had only a four-day turn-around after their first match, and let the game slip out of their reach within the final 20 minutes. They produced a repeat result of 2007, by playing to a 23–23 draw against Japan. Their Rugby World Cup concluded with a 79–15 loss against the All Blacks. Canada finished fourth in their pool, narrowly missing out on automatic qualification for the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

2015 Rugby World Cup

Canada secured a spot in the 2015 Rugby World Cup on 23 August 2013, with a 13–11 win over the USA, 40–20 on aggregate.

They join Pool D with France, Ireland, Italy and Romania.

Canada finished the tournament with zero wins, last in Pool D.

Stadium

The national team currently does not have a permanent home stadium and as such play their matches at various locations across Canada. BMO Field in Toronto, Ontario has been proposed as the national team's home stadium, even though it cannot provide a suitable rugby climate year-round. However, rumours have the national team playing out of the proposed Whitecaps Waterfront Stadium in Vancouver, British Columbia if it is constructed.[citation needed] This would place the national rugby stadium in the country's main rugby stronghold of British Columbia, and in a city whose winter climate is considerably milder than that of most of the rest of Canada.

In August 2011 it was announced that the national team would have a permanent training centre located in Langford, British Columbia.[13]

Record

World Cup

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round P W D L F A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Pool Stage 3 1 0 2 65 90 Automatically qualified
United KingdomRepublic of IrelandFrance 1991 Quarter Final 4 2 0 2 58 62 4 3 0 1 67 38
South Africa 1995 Pool Stage 3 1 0 2 45 50 Automatically qualified
Wales 1999 Pool Stage 3 1 0 2 114 82 3 2 0 1 97 83
Australia 2003 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 54 135 6 5 0 1 192 80
France 2007 Pool Stage 4 0 1 3 51 120 2 2 0 0 125 10
New Zealand 2011 Pool Stage 4 1 1 2 82 168 2 2 0 0 47 30
England 2015 Pool Stage 4 0 0 4 58 131 2 2 0 0 40 20
Total 8/8 25 7 2 20 527 838 19 16 0 3 568 261

Overall

Top 30 rankings as of 30 May 2016[14]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  New Zealand 96.10
2 Steady  Australia 89.33
3 Steady  South Africa 87.66
4 Steady  England 84.60
5 Increase 1  Argentina 82.59
6 Decrease 1  Wales 82.49
7 Steady  Ireland 80.33
8 Steady  France 78.36
9 Steady  Scotland 78.32
10 Steady  Japan 77.05
11 Steady  Fiji 76.96
12 Steady  Georgia 72.62
13 Steady  Tonga 71.60
14 Steady  Italy 70.78
15 Steady  Samoa 70.36
16 Steady  Romania 67.52
17 Steady  United States 65.68
18 Steady  Canada 64.27
19 Steady  Russia 63.56
20 Steady  Uruguay 63.23
21 Steady  Namibia 61.75
22 Steady  Spain 60.87
23 Steady  Hong Kong 58.43
24 Steady  Belgium 57.94
25 Steady  Germany 57.71
26 Steady  Ukraine 56.95
27 Steady  Kenya 55.89
28 Steady  Chile 55.89
29 Steady  South Korea 55.45
30 Steady  Portugal 54.29
*Change from the previous week
Canada's Historical Rankings
Canada IRB World Rankings.png
Source: World Rugby - Graph updated to 1 November 2015[14]

Below is table of the representative rugby matches played by a Canada national XV at test level up until 17 March 2016.[15]

Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Argentina 9 3 6 0 33.33% 159 277 –118
 Australia 6 0 6 0 0.00% 60 283 –223
 Barbados 1 1 0 0 100.00% 69 3 +66
 Barbarians 2 0 1 1 0.00% 7 32 –25
 Belgium 1 1 0 0 100.00% 43 12 +31
 Brazil 1 1 0 0 100.00% 52 25 +27
 British and Irish Lions 1 0 1 0 0.00% 8 19 –11
 Chile 3 3 0 0 100.00% 120 30 +90
 England 6 0 6 0 0.00% 73 273 –200
 England XV 6 1 5 0 16.67% 40 159 –119
 England U23 2 0 2 0 0.00% 22 55 –33
England England Saxons 3 0 3 0 0.00% 41 132 –91
 Fiji 10 3 7 0 30.00% 191 314 –123
 France 9 1 8 0 11.11% 119 315 –196
 France XV 1 0 1 0 0.00% 9 24 –15
 France A 1 0 1 0 0.00% 15 34 –19
 Georgia 5 3 2 0 60.00% 119 78 +41
 Hong Kong 6 5 1 0 83.33% 182 99 +83
 Ireland 7 0 6 1 0.00% 84 276 –192
 Ireland XV 1 0 1 0 0.00% 21 24 –3
 Italy 8 2 6 0 25.00% 110 226 –116
 Japan 24 8 14 2 33.33% 559 586 –27
 Namibia 2 2 0 0 100.00% 89 24 +65
 New Zealand 5 0 5 0 0.00% 54 313 –259
 New Zealand XV 1 0 1 0 0.00% 10 43 –33
 Māori All Blacks 2 0 2 0 0.00% 36 95 –59
 Portugal 4 4 0 0 100.00% 138 53 +85
 Romania 6 2 4 0 33.33% 117 92 +25
 Russia 3 3 0 0 100.00% 91 27 +64
 Samoa 5 0 5 0 0% 80 144 –64
 Scotland 4 1 3 0 25.00% 49 105 –56
 Scotland XV 1 1 0 0 100.00% 24 19 +5
 Scotland A 1 0 1 0 0.00% 10 15 –5
 South Africa 2 0 2 0 0.00% 18 71 –53
 Spain 1 1 0 0 100.00% 60 22 +38
 Tonga 8 5 3 0 62.50% 193 155 +38
 United States 55 38 16 1 69.01% 1284 840 +444
 Uruguay 9 8 1 0 88.88% 280 125 +155
 Wales 12 1 11 0 8.33% 207 460 –253
 Wales XV 3 0 3 0 0.00% 37 138 –101
 Wales U23 1 0 1 0 0.00% 0 8 –8
Total 238 98 135 5 41.18% 4880 6025 –1145

Wins against Tier 1 nations

The following is a list of Canada's wins against Tier 1 countries:

Players

Current squad

On 19 May 2016, newly appointed head coach Mark Anscombe, named his fist squad - a 35-man training squad ahead of the June tests against Japan, Russia and Italy.[16]

Head Coach: New Zealand Mark Anscombe

  • Caps updated: 19 May 2016

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Barkwill, RayRay Barkwill Hooker (1980-08-26) 26 August 1980 (age 38) 30 United States Sacramento
Howard, EricEric Howard Hooker (1993-09-05) 5 September 1993 (age 25) 2 Canada Ontario Blues
Quattrin, AndrewAndrew Quattrin Hooker 0 Canada Aurora Barbarians
Buydens, HubertHubert Buydens Prop (1982-01-04) 4 January 1982 (age 37) 43 United States San Diego
Dolezel, TomTom Dolezel Prop (1984-08-13) 13 August 1984 (age 34) 13 Canada Ontario Blues
Ilnicki, JakeJake Ilnicki Prop (1992-02-24) 24 February 1992 (age 27) 12 United States San Diego
Kotlewski, RyanRyan Kotlewski Prop (1990-02-21) 21 February 1990 (age 29) 1 Canada Prairie Wolf Pack
Sears-Duru, DjusticeDjustice Sears-Duru Prop (1994-05-24) 24 May 1994 (age 24) 16 Scotland Glasgow Warriors
Tierney, MattMatt Tierney Prop (1996-04-07) 7 April 1996 (age 23) 0 Canada Ontario Blues
Baillie, KyleKyle Baillie Lock (1991-04-07) 7 April 1991 (age 28) 3 United States Ohio
Ciulini, PaulPaul Ciulini Lock (1995-10-28) 28 October 1995 (age 23) 4 Canada Ontario Blues
Cudmore, JamieJamie Cudmore Lock (1978-09-06) 6 September 1978 (age 40) 39 France Clermont
Pierce, CameronCameron Pierce Lock (1991-10-26) 26 October 1991 (age 27) 2 France Pau
Olmstead, EvanEvan Olmstead Lock (1991-02-21) 21 February 1991 (age 28) 7 England London Scottish
Clark, AlistairAlistair Clark Flanker (1987-07-04) 4 July 1987 (age 31) 4 Canada Ontario Blues
Gilmour, KyleKyle Gilmour Flanker (1988-01-26) 26 January 1988 (age 31) 15 England Rotherham
Heaton, MattMatt Heaton Flanker (1992-02-09) 9 February 1992 (age 27) 0 Canada Atlantic Rock
Rumball, LucasLucas Rumball Flanker (1995-10-28) 28 October 1995 (age 23) 4 Canada Ontario Blues
Panga, ClayClay Panga Number 8 (1985-07-06) 6 July 1985 (age 33) 4 Canada Prairie Wolf Pack
Carpenter, AaronAaron Carpenter Number 8 (1983-01-09) 9 January 1983 (age 36) 71 England Cornish Pirates
Ferguson, AndrewAndrew Ferguson Scrum-half (1992-05-01) 1 May 1992 (age 27) 3 Canada Ontario Blues
Mackenzie, JamieJamie Mackenzie Scrum-half (1989-02-28) 28 February 1989 (age 30) 8 Canada Ontario Blues
McRorie, GordonGordon McRorie Scrum-half (1988-05-12) 12 May 1988 (age 31) 18 Canada Prairie Wolf Pack
Horgan, DylanDylan Horgan Fly-half (1996-03-19) 19 March 1996 (age 23) 0 Ireland University College Cork
Parfrey, PatPat Parfrey Fly-half (1991-11-01) 1 November 1991 (age 27) 11 Canada Atlantic Rock
du Toit, GuiseppeGuiseppe du Toit Fly-half (1995-07-29) 29 July 1995 (age 23) 0 Canada BC Bears
Blevins, NickNick Blevins Centre (1988-11-11) 11 November 1988 (age 30) 32 United States San Francisco
Hearn, CiaranCiaran Hearn Centre (1985-12-30) 30 December 1985 (age 33) 49 England London Irish
LeSage, BenBen LeSage Centre (1995-11-24) 24 November 1995 (age 23) 0 Canada Prairie Wolf Pack
Samson, MozacMozac Samson Centre (1985-09-01) 1 September 1985 (age 33) 2 Canada Prairie Wolf Pack
Cooper, TrentonTrenton Cooper Centre 0 Canada Ontario Blues
Moor, DanDan Moor Wing (1990-07-24) 24 July 1990 (age 28) 4 Canada Ontario Blues
Paris, TaylorTaylor Paris Wing (1992-10-06) 6 October 1992 (age 26) 13 France Agen
Sauder, TheoTheo Sauder Wing 0 Canada UBC Thunderbirds
Wilson-Ross, JordanJordan Wilson-Ross Wing (1989-01-17) 17 January 1989 (age 30) 3 Canada Ontario Blues
Staller, BrockBrock Staller Fullback (1992-03-24) 24 March 1992 (age 27) 2 Canada BC Bears
Evans, MattMatt Evans Fullback (1988-01-02) 2 January 1988 (age 31) 32 England Cornish Pirates

Individual all-time records

Most caps

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Won Lost Draw %
1. Al Charron Flanker 1990–2003 76 76 0 44 9 0 0 0 40 36 0 52.63
2. Aaron Carpenter Number 8, Hooker 2005– 71 55 16 75 15 0 0 0 27 42 2 39.43
3. Winston Stanley Wing 1994–2003 66 64 2 123 24 0 0 1 27 38 1 41.66
4. Scott Stewart Fullback 1989–2001 64 62 2 84 5 9 14 0 29 34 1 46.09
5. James Pritchard Fullback 2003–2015 62 58 4 607 18 104 103 0 26 34 2 43.54
Rod Snow Prop 1995–2007 62 59 3 40 8 0 0 0 27 33 2 45.16
7. Bobby Ross Fly-half 1989–2003 58 40 18 419 7 51 84 10 30 28 0 51.72
8. Ed Fairhurst Scrum-half 2001–2012 57 35 22 46 4 4 6 0 22 34 1 39.47
9. Mike James Lock 1994–2007 56 56 0 20 4 0 0 0 26 29 1 47.32
Morgan Williams Scrum-half 1999–2008 56 52 4 68 13 0 0 1 18 36 2 33.92
Last updated: Romania vs Canada, 6 October 2015. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[17]

Most tries

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1. Winston Stanley Wing 1994–2003 66 64 2 123 24 0 0 1
2. DTH van der Merwe Wing, Centre 2006– 39 35 4 100 20 0 0 0
3. James Pritchard Fullback 2003–2015 62 58 4 607 18 104 103 0
4. Aaron Carpenter Number 8, Hooker 2005– 71 55 16 75 15 0 0 0
5. Morgan Williams Scrum-half 1999–2008 56 52 4 68 13 0 0 1
6. Kyle Nichols Centre 1996–2002 25 22 3 61 10 1 3 0
6. Pat Palmer Wing 1983–1992 17 17 0 36 10 0 0 0
7. Al Charron Flanker 1990–2003 76 76 0 44 9 0 0 0
John Graf Scrum-half 1989–1999 54 51 3 89 9 7 9 1
Ryan Smith Centre 2003–2011 51 38 13 45 9 0 0 0
Last updated: Romania vs Canada, 6 October 2015. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[18]

Most points

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1. James Pritchard Fullback 2003–2015 62 58 4 607 18 101 99 0
2. Gareth Rees Fly-half 1986–1999 55 54 1 491 7 51 110 9
3. Bobby Ross Fly-half 1989–2003 58 40 18 419 7 51 84 10
4. Mark Wyatt Fullback 1982–1991 29 29 0 227 1 23 55 4
5. Jared Barker Fly-half 2000–2004 18 17 1 226 2 24 55 1
6. Winston Stanley Wing 1994–2003 66 64 2 123 24 0 0 1
7. DTH van der Merwe Wing 2006– 39 35 4 100 20 0 0 0
8. John Graf Scrum-half 1989–1999 54 51 3 89 9 7 7 1
9. Scott Stewart Fullback 1989–2001 64 62 2 84 5 9 14 0
10. Aaron Carpenter Number 8, Hooker 2005– 71 55 16 75 15 0 0 0
Last updated: Romania vs Canada, 6 October 2015. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[19]
  • Note, Gareth Rees points total is in dispute, some sources claim 487 while others including the IRB claim 491.

Most points in a match

Australian born James Pritchard is Canada's second highest try scorer and points scorer of all time, he also holds the record for most points in a match with 36 against the USA in 2006.
# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1. James Pritchard Wing 36 3 6 3 0  United States Canada St John's 12/08/2006
2. James Pritchard Wing 29 3 7 0 0  Barbados Barbados Bridgetown 24/06/2006
3. Gareth Rees Fly-half 27 0 9 3 0  Namibia France Toulouse 14/10/1999
James Pritchard Fullback 27 2 4 3 0  Portugal Portugal Lisbon 23/11/2013
5. Bobby Ross Fly-half 26 1 3 5 0  Japan Canada Vancouver 13/07/1996
6. Mark Wyatt Fullback 24 0 0 8 0  Scotland XV Canada Saint John 25/05/1991
7. Gareth Rees Fly-half 23 0 1 7 0  Argentina Argentina Buenos Aires 22/08/1998
James Pritchard Fullback 23 1 3 4 0  Tonga Canada Kingston 08/06/2013
9. 5 players on 22 points
Last updated: Chile vs Canada, 5 March 2016. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[20]

Most tries in a match

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1 Kyle Nichols Centre 20 4 0 0 0  Japan Canada Markham 15/07/2000
2 Steve Gray Centre 15 3 0 0 0  United States Canada Vancouver 10/05/1987
James Pritchard Wing 27 3 7 0 0  Barbados Barbados Bridgetown 24/06/2006
James Pritchard Wing 36 3 6 3 0  United States Canada St John's 12/08/2006
5 46 players on 2 tries
Last updated: USA vs Canada, 21 June 2014. Statistics include officially capped matches only.

[21]

Most matches as captain

# Player Pos Span Mat Won Lost Draw % Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1. Al Charron Flanker 1996–2003 25 13 12 0 52.00 10 2 0 0 0
Gareth Rees Fly-half 1994–1999 25 10 15 0 40.00 285 4 38 60 3
3. Pat Riordan Hooker 2008–2011 23 12 10 1 54.34 15 3 0 0 0
4. John Graf Scrum-half 1995–1999 15 9 6 0 60.00 58 6 5 6 0
Morgan Williams Scrum-half 2005–2007 15 5 9 1 36.66 25 5 0 0 0
6. Aaron Carpenter Number 8 2012–2013 13 7 6 0 53.84 15 3 0 0 0
7. Tyler Ardron Hooker 2013–2015 11 0 11 0 00.00 5 1 0 0 0
Mark Wyatt Fullback 1990–1991 9 6 3 0 66.66 97 2 13 21 0
9. Hans de Goede Lock 1984–1987 8 4 4 0 50.00 0 0 0 0 0
Mike Luke Hooker 1974–1981 8 3 5 0 37.50 0 0 0 0 0
Last updated: Romania vs Canada, 6 October 2015. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[22]

Youngest players

# Player Pos Age Opposition Venue Date
1. Taylor Paris Wing 18 years and 31 days  Belgium Belgium Brussels 06/11/2010
2. Mark Schiefler Centre 19 years and 46 days  United States United States Saranac Lake 08/06/1980
3. Gareth Rees Fly-half 19 years and 131 days  United States United States Tucson 08/11/1986
4. Dave Spicer Fly-half 19 years and 166 days  England England Twickenham 13/11/2004
5. Djustice Sears-Duru Prop 19 years and 183 days  Portugal Portugal Lisbon 23/11/2013
6. Winston Stanley Wing 19 years and 308 days  United States United States Long Beach 21/05/1994
7. Bobby Ross Centre 20 years and 4 days  Ireland Canada Victoria 02/09/1989
8. DTH van der Merwe Fullback 20 years and 57 days  Barbados Barbados Bridgetown 24/06/2006
9. Mike Pyke Wing 20 years and 64 days  United States Japan Tokyo 27/05/2004
10. Connor Braid Fullback 20 years and 159 days  Belgium Belgium Brussels 06/11/2010
Last updated: USA vs Canada, 21 June 2014. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[23]

Oldest players

# Player Pos Age Opposition Venue Date
1. Kevin Wirachowski Prop 40 years and 243 days New Zealand New Zealand Māori Canada Toronto 02/08/2003
2. Ro Hindson Lock 38 years and 311 days  Argentina Canada Burnaby Lake 30/03/1990
3. Mark Cardinal Hooker 38 years and 162 days  Namibia France Toulouse 14/10/1999
4. Rod Snow Prop 37 years and 151 days  Australia France Bordeaux 29/09/2007
5. Al Charron Lock 37 years and 94 days  Tonga Australia Wollongong 29/10/2003
6. Jamie Cudmore Lock 37 years and 30 days  Romania England Leicester 06/10/2015
7. Gord MacKinnon Flanker 36 years and 280 days  South Africa South Africa Port Elizabeth 03/06/1995
8. Julian Loveday Wing 36 years and 99 days  Tonga Tonga Nuku'alofa 03/07/1999
9. James Pritchard Wing 36 years and 77 days  Romania England Leicester 03/08/2015
10. Mike Luke Hooker 35 years and 245 days  United States United States Albany 12/06/1982
Last updated: Romania vs Canada, 6 October 2015. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[24]

Upcoming fixtures and recent results

Upcoming fixtures

Date Tournament Location Venue Opponent
June 11, 2016 Test match Vancouver BC Place  Japan
June 18, 2016 Test match Calgary Calgary Rugby Park  Russia
June 26, 2016 Test match Toronto BMO Field  Italy
November 12, 2016 Test match Dublin, Ireland Aviva Stadium  Ireland

Recent results

Date Tournament Location Venue Opponent Result Score
March 6, 2016 Americas Rugby Championship Santiago, Chile Estadio San Carlos de Apoquindo  Chile Win 64–13
February 27, 2016 Americas Rugby Championship Rosario, Argentina Duendes Rugby Club  Argentina XV Loss 54–21
February 20, 2016 Americas Rugby Championship Langford Westhills Stadium  Brazil Win 52–25
February 13, 2016 Americas Rugby Championship Round Rock, Texas, United States Dell Diamond  United States Loss 30–22
February 6, 2016 Americas Rugby Championship Langford Westhills Stadium  Uruguay Win 33–17
October 6, 2015 Rugby World Cup Leicester, England Leicester City Stadium  Romania Loss 17–15
October 1, 2015 Rugby World Cup Milton Keynes, England Stadium mk  France Loss 41–18
September 26, 2015 Rugby World Cup Leeds, England Elland Road  Italy Loss 23–18
September 19, 2015 Rugby World Cup Cardiff, Wales Millennium Stadium  Ireland Loss 50–7
September 6, 2015 RWC warm-up match London, England Twickenham Stoop  Fiji Loss 47–18
Green background indicates a win. Red background indicates a loss. Yellow background indicates a draw.

See also

References

  1. USA and Canada join IRB PN Cup
  2. "Canada beat Barbados 71-3 in Rugby World Cup qualifier". Caribbean Net News. June 26, 2006. Retrieved 23 November 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "Canada book Wales RWC encounter". BBC News. 13 August 2006. Retrieved 28 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Canada claim Americas 2 spot". therugbyworldcup.co.uk. Retrieved 22 August 2006.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. "Rugby World Cup 2007 Latest Betting - 07-11-07". Online-gambling-insider.com. 2011-11-18. Retrieved 2012-03-16.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "Wales 42–17 Canada". BBC News. 9 September 2007. Retrieved 28 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Malin, Ian (17 September 2007). "Fiji send Wales a mixed message". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 28 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Millward, Robert (26 September 2007). "Canada 12 Japan 12: Japan celebrates ending losing streak after draw". The Independent. London. Retrieved 28 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Malley, Frank (30 September 2007). "Mitchell double helps subdue brave Canada". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 28 April 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Former All Black appointed Canada coach". rugbyweek.com. 18 March 2008. Retrieved 26 January 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. [1][dead link]
  12. "Canada qualify for 2011 World Cup". BBC Sport. 2009-07-12. Retrieved 2009-07-13.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. [2][dead link]
  14. 14.0 14.1 "World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 22 April 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. Canada Rugby Stats
  16. ANSCOMBE NAMES TRAINING CAMP SQUAD AHEAD OF SUMMER SERIES
  17. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_matches.html?id=25;type=team
  18. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_tries.html?id=25;type=team
  19. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_points.html?id=25;type=team
  20. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_points_match.html?id=25;type=team
  21. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_tries_match.html?id=25;type=team
  22. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/most_matches_captain.html?id=25;type=team
  23. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/youngest_appearance.html?id=25;type=team
  24. http://stats.espnscrum.com/scrum/rugby/records/player/oldest_appearance.html?id=25;type=team

External links