Paul Laux

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Paul Laux
File:Paul Laux (general).jpg
Born 11 November 1887
Weimar
Died 2 September 1944(1944-09-02) (aged 56)
Riga
Allegiance  German Empire (to 1918)
 Weimar Republic (to 1933)
 Nazi Germany
Service/branch Heer
Years of service 1907–44
Rank General der Infanterie
Commands held 126. Infanterie-Division
II Armeekorps
16. Armee
Battles/wars World War I

World War II

Awards Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves

Paul Laux (11 November 1887 – 2 September 1944) was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded the 16. Armee. He was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

After Laux was promoted to Generalmajor on 1 April 1938, he took command of the 10. Division troops that were stationed in Passau. On 18 March some of these troops reached Vienna.[1]

In March 1939, when National Socialists and the 85. Infanterie-Regiment commemorated fallen heroes on the Passau Cathedral Square, Laux praised Adolf Hitler.[2] Next, his men invaded Bohemia. On April 13, Laux commemorated the Annexation of Austria in Passau.[3]

After he became commander of the 126. Infanterie-Division, he invaded the Soviet Union.[4] On 29 August 1944 Paul Laux crashed during a reconnaissance flight. He died of his injuries on 2 September 1944.

Awards and decorations

References

Citations

  1. Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, pp. 139f
  2. Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, pp. 199f
  3. Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, p. 139
  4. Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, p. 200
  5. 5.0 5.1 Thomas 1998, p. 16.
  6. Fellgiebel 2000, p. 234.
  7. Fellgiebel 2000, p. 60.

Bibliography

  • Fellgiebel, Walther-Peer (2000). Die Träger des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939–1945 — Die Inhaber der höchsten Auszeichnung des Zweiten Weltkrieges aller Wehrmachtteile (in German). Friedberg, Germany: Podzun-Pallas. ISBN 978-3-7909-0284-6. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Scherzer, Veit (2007). Die Ritterkreuzträger 1939–1945 Die Inhaber des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939 von Heer, Luftwaffe, Kriegsmarine, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm sowie mit Deutschland verbündeter Streitkräfte nach den Unterlagen des Bundesarchives (in German). Jena, Germany: Scherzers Miltaer-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-938845-17-2. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Thomas, Franz (1998). Die Eichenlaubträger 1939–1945 Band 2: L–Z (in German). Osnabrück, Germany: Biblio-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-7648-2300-9. Unknown parameter |trans_title= ignored (help) <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
none
Commander of 126. Infanterie-Division
15 October 1940 – 8 October 1942
Succeeded by
Generalleutnant Harry Hoppe
Preceded by
General der Infanterie Walter Graf von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt
Commander of II. Armeekorps
28 November 1943 – 1 April 1944
Succeeded by
Generalleutnant Wilhelm Hasse
Preceded by
Generalleutnant Kurt von Tippelskirch
Commander of II. Armeekorps
11 May 1944 – 3 July 1944
Succeeded by
Generalleutnant Wilhelm Hasse
Preceded by
General der Artillerie Christian Hansen
Commander of 16. Armee
2 July 1944 – 30 August 1944
Succeeded by
Generaloberst Carl Hilpert