Portal:Hellenismos

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Hellenismos Portal

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Torch: symbol of enlightenment, and additionally in Hellenism: of wisdom and either life or death.
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Laurel_wreath: victory & archetype in Hellenism.

Hellenism or the Hellenic Ethnic Religion (Greek: Ελληνική Εθνική Θρησκεία), also, Dodekatheism (Greek: Δωδεκαθεϊσμός), Greek polytheism or Olympianism, is the Olympian-based Greek religion and philosophy of modern times. Hellenism as a term was first used in the fourth century by Roman Emperor Julian the Philosopher to reference the Greek religion, and today it includes its continuation. Practitioners are found in the modern Greece and throughout the world.

Hellenism is the mythology, philosophy, theology, and religion of the Greek gods, such as Dodecatheism, the Eleusinian mysteries, the Delphic mysteries, Hermetism, the Dionysian mysteries, Orphism and Pythagoreanism, the Milesian school, the Eleatic school, other pre-Socratic philosophy, Platonism and the Peripatetic school, neo-Platonism and Skepticism and Stoicism and other Hellenistic philosophy from ancient times to the present day.

Important ancient or classical Hellenic teachers, writers, and prophets include Hermes Trismegistus, the Pythia and Sibyl, Hesiod, Apollodorus, Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes, Creophylus of Samos, Orpheus, Thales, Anaximander, Pherecydes of Syros, Xenophanes, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, the seven sages of Greece, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Parmenides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Antisthenes, Aristippus, Euclid of Megara, Pyrrho, Zeno of Citium, Epicurus, Ammonius Saccas, Plotinus, and Hypatia of Alexandria, among others.Template:/box-footer

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Raphael's School of Athens, depicting an array of ancient Greek philosophers engaged in discussion.]]
Ancient Greek philosophy arose in the 6th century BCE and continued through the Hellenistic period, at which point Ancient Greece was incorporated in the Roman Empire. It dealt with a wide variety of subjects, including political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, ontology, logic, biology, rhetoric, and aesthetics.

Many philosophers today maintain that Greek philosophy has influenced much of Western thought since its inception. Alfred Whitehead once noted: "The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato."[1] Clear, unbroken lines of influence lead from ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophers, to medieval Islamic philosophers, to the European Renaissance and Enlightenment.

Some claim that Greek philosophy, in turn, was influenced by the older wisdom literature and mythological cosmogonies of the ancient Near East. Martin Litchfield West gives qualified assent to this view, stating, "contact with oriental cosmology and theology helped to liberate the early Greek philosophers' imagination; it certainly gave them many suggestive ideas. But they taught themselves to reason. Philosophy as we understand it is a Greek creation."[2]

Subsequent philosophic tradition was so influenced by Socrates as presented by Plato that it is conventional to refer to ancient Greek philosophy prior to Socrates as pre-Socratic philosophy. The period following this until the wars of Alexander the Great is referred to as classical Greek philosophy, followed by Hellenistic philosophy.

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Roman mosaic depicting Orpheus, wearing a Phrygian cap and surrounded by the beasts charmed by the music of his lyre
Orpheus (/ˈɔːrfəs/ or /ˈɔːrfjuːs/; Ancient Greek: Ὀρφεύς) was a legendary musician, poet, and prophet in ancient Greek religion and myth. The major stories about him are centered on his ability to charm all living things and even stones with his music; his attempt to retrieve his wife from the underworld; and his death at the hands of those who could not hear his divine music. As an archetype of the inspired singer, Orpheus is one of the most significant figures in the reception of classical mythology in Western culture, portrayed or alluded to in countless forms of art and popular culture including poetry, opera, and painting.[3]

To the Greeks, Orpheus was a founder and prophet of the so-called "Orphic" mysteries. He was credited with the composition of the Orphic Hymns, a collection of which survives. Shrines containing purported relics of Orpheus were regarded as oracles. Ancient Greek sources note Orpheus's Thracian origins.[4][5] Archaeologists have interpreted finds within ancient Thrace as evidence of Orphic cult.[6]

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Hellenism's main news source from Greece: YSEE (translated to English)Template:/box-footer

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Chronos, sleeping on Georg Wolff's grave
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Pythagoras studied in the East, including at Mt. Carmel. He and the community (near) there had similar rare practices of ethics (and dress,) and later Socrates described some as virtuous and philosophical. Likewise, a similar community South of Mt. Carmel later kept a text of Plato's Republic, a dialogue in which Socrates spoke. This interaction has influenced various spirituality near the Eastern Mediterranean to the present day.Template:/box-footer

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Ancient thought/literature: TheogonyWorks And DaysTitansTitanomachyThe LibraryMount OlympusOlympiansHermetismDelphic MaximsArgonauticaOrphic & Homeric HymnsEpic cycle

Ancient religious traditions: amphidromiaiatromantislibationsorthopraxyvotive offerings

Ancient places, events: Athens & Agora & Acropolis & Parthenon & Democracy & Battle of SalamisSparta & Timocracy & Battle of ThermopylaeDelphi & Pythia & SibylThebesGreek templesancient persecution of HellenismGreek War of Independence

Ancient thinkers & ideas: Hermes TrismegistusThalesPythagorasEuclidArchimedesSocrates & Plato & AristotleAmmonius SaccasPlotinusHypatiaphilosophysciencelogicmathematicsliberal artsdramapoliticsRepublic

Great ancient leaders: PericlesLeonidasThemistoclesAlexander The Great

Great ancient playwrights: Sophocles

Great ancient sculptors: PolykleitosLysipposScopasPhidias

Modern reconstruction movement: Hellenism (religion)EllinaisHellenionSupreme Council of Ethnikoi HellenesTemplate:/box-footer

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Template:/box-header Make a wikiproject Hellenismos and a Hermetism portal. Make a wiki page explaining how to do 'selected articles/biographies, pictures.'

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  1. Alfred North Whitehead, Process and Reality, Chap. I, Sect. I
  2. Griffin, Jasper; Boardman, John; Murray, Oswyn (2001). The Oxford history of Greece and the Hellenistic world. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. p. 140. ISBN 0-19-280137-6.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Geoffrey Miles, Classical Mythology in English Literature: A Critical Anthology (Routledge, 1999), p. 54ff.
  4. Fritz Graf and Sarah Iles Johnston, Ritual Texts for the Afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (Routledge, 2007), p. 167, while taking note of depictions in Greek art, particularly vase painting, that show Orpheus attired as a Greek, often in contrast to those in Thracian dress around him.
  5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, 2.30.1
  6. http://uni-sofia.academia.edu/PeterDelev/Papers/357792/The_Middle_Mesta_Region_in_Antiquity

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