Tidal island

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A diagram of a tidal island at low and high tide.
Cramond Island seen from the air. The causeway is completely submerged at high tide

A tidal island is a piece of land that is connected to the mainland by a natural or man-made causeway that is exposed at low tide and submerged at high tide. Because of the mystique surrounding tidal islands many of them have been sites of religious worship, such as Mont Saint-Michel with its Benedictine Abbey. Tidal islands are also commonly the sites of fortresses because of their natural fortifications.

List of tidal islands

Asia

Hong Kong

South Korea

Europe

Channel Islands

Denmark

France

Germany/Denmark

Ireland

Spain

United Kingdom

Worm's Head at the end of Gower, Wales

43 (unbridged) tidal islands can be walked to from the UK mainland.[1]

North America

Canada

United States

Bar Island in Maine, U.S.

Australasia

Australia

New Zealand

Rangitoto Island forms a backdrop to the wave-cut platform off Achilles Point, Auckland

See also

References

  1. Peter Caton (2011). No Boat Required – Exploring Tidal Islands. ISBN 978-1848767-010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. longpointisland.com