Timeline of Irish National Liberation Army actions

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This is a timeline of actions by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), an Irish republican socialist paramilitary group. Most of these actions took place as part of its 1975–1998 campaign during "the Troubles" in Northern Ireland.

1970s

1974

1975

  • 25 February: the INLA shot dead Official Irish Republican Army (Official IRA) volunteer Sean Fox in the Divis Flats area of Belfast as part of a feud between the two republican groups.
  • 6 April: the Official IRA shot dead INLA volunteer Daniel Loghran on Albert Street, Belfast. Part of the feud.
  • 12 April: the INLA shot dead Official IRA volunteer Paul Crawford on Falls Road, Belfast. Part of the feud.
  • 28 April: the INLA shot dead Official IRA volunteer Billy McMillen on Falls Road, Belfast. Part of the feud.
  • 24 May: a Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officer was killed by an INLA booby trap bomb left in a car in Ballinahone, near Maghera, County Londonderry.
  • 5 June: the Official IRA shot dead INLA volunteer Brendan McNamee on Stewartstown Road, Belfast. Part of the feud.
  • 26 July: an INLA sniper shot dead an RUC officer shortly after he left his armoured personnel carrier in Dungiven, County Londonderry.
  • 10 October: a British Army soldier died two weeks after being shot by an INLA sniper while on patrol on Iniscarn Road, Derry.
  • 2 December: two civilians were shot dead while sitting in the Dolphin Café on Strand Road, Derry. Gunmen carrying pistols picked them out and opened fire without warning. The INLA later admitted responsibility and claimed its gunmen believed the two men were members of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).[1]

References for this year:[2][3]

1976

  • 7 February: fourteen-year-old Thomas Rafferty was killed when he triggered a booby-trap bomb concealed behind a row of derelict cottages, Derryall Road, Portadown, County Armagh; it was believed to have been left by the INLA for future use against security forces
  • 3 August: an INLA sniper shot dead British soldier Alan Watkins on foot patrol, Dungiven, County Londonderry.
  • 14 September: INLA and IRA prisoners in Maze Prison began the blanket protest.
  • 25 September: the INLA launched a gun attack at a house on Ormonde Park, Finaghy, Belfast. Gunmen opened fire in the hallway, killing a married couple, both civilians (James and Rosaleen Kyle). A detective said that it was thought to be a case of mistaken identity. In the Belfast Street Directory, James Kyle was described as a "chief inspector" and it was assumed the gunmen thought he was an RUC officer, but, in fact, Kyle had been a bank inspector until two months before his death, on 28 October 1976.[4]
  • 25 November: the INLA shot dead British soldier Andrew Crocker when he arrived at the scene of an armed robbery at a Belfast post office.
  • 22 December: the INLA killed RUC officer Samuel Armour with a booby-trap bomb attached to his car outside his home, Curragh Road, Maghera, County Londonderry.
  • 29 December: civilian security guard James Liggett died two weeks after being shot trying to stop a bomb attack on the Tavern Bar, Edenderry, Portadown, County Armagh.[5]

References for this year:[6][7]

1977

  • 23 January: an INLA sniper shot dead British soldier Alan Muncaster while on foot patrol, Eliza Street, Markets, Belfast.
  • 1 March: the INLA shot magistrate Robert Whitten, on Thomas Street, Portadown. He died of his wounds on 19 June 1977. The mother and brother of the 16-year-old INLA member who killed the magistrate had both reportedly been killed previously in separate loyalist attacks.[8]
  • 5 October: INLA founder and leader Seamus Costello was shot dead by the Official IRA in Northbrook Avenue, Dublin. Part of a republican feud.
  • 12 December: undercover British Army soldiers shot dead INLA volunteer Colm McNutt in Derry

References for this year:[9][10]

1978

  • 8 March: the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) shot dead INLA volunteer Thomas Trainor, together with a civilian, Denis Kelly, as they both left a Department of Health and Social Services office, Armagh Road, Portadown, County Armagh.[11]

1979

  • 6 March: the INLA exploded a booby-trap bomb underneath the car of Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) soldier Robert McNally as he was leaving a car park, West Street, Portadown, County Armagh. McNally died on 13 March.
  • 30 March: Airey Neave, British Conservative Party Member of Parliament and adviser to Margaret Thatcher, was killed by a booby-trap bomb underneath his car at the House of Commons; the INLA claimed responsibility.
  • 19 April: the INLA shot dead prison officer Agnes Wallace during a gun and grenade attack outside Armagh Prison.
  • 27 July: former RUC officer James Wright was killed by a booby trap bomb attached to his car by the INLA outside his home, Corcrain Drive, Portadown, County Armagh.
  • 31 July: the INLA shot dead RUC officer George Walsh from a passing car while Walsh sat in a stationary car, outside Armagh Courthouse, Armagh town.
  • 7 November: the INLA shot dead David Teeney, who was employed by the Northern Ireland Prison Service. He was shot at a bus stop shortly after leaving Crumlin Road Prison, Belfast.

References for this year:[12][13]

1980s

1980

  • 13 January: a civilian (John Brown) died seven months after being shot by the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) during an armed robbery at the post office where he worked on Main Street, Blackwatertown, County Armagh.
  • 9 August: an INLA sniper accidentally shot dead a civilian (James McCarren) during a sniper attack on a British Army mobile patrol, Shaw's Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.
  • 29 August: a civilian (Frank McGrory) died after inadvertently detonating a booby trap bomb which had been hidden in a hedgerow, at Carnagh, near Keady, County Armagh. It is believed to have been left there by the INLA for use against the security forces.
  • 15 October: the UDA shot dead INLA leader Ronnie Bunting and INLA member Noel Lyttle at Bunting's home in Downfine Gardens, Belfast. Bunting's wife, Suzanne, was wounded in the attack.
  • 19 November: the INLA shot dead a civilian (Thomas Orr) outside his workplace, Ulster Bank on Boucher Road, Belfast. It emerged that the shooting was a case of mistaken identity. The intended target had been an RUC reservist who worked at the bank. The reservist had sold a car to the victim two weeks earlier. He had taken the precaution of changing the vehicle's registration number but the gunmen had identified the car by its make and colour.[14]
  • 10 December: the INLA shot dead an off-duty UDR soldier (Colin Quinn) after leaving his workplace, Fox Row, off Durham Street, Belfast.
  • 28 December: the INLA shot dead an off-duty British soldier (Hugh McGinn) outside his home, Umgola Villas, Umgola, near Armagh town.

References for this year:[15][16]

1981

  • 8 January: the INLA fired shots at an RUC patrol on Great Victoria Street, Belfast. One RUC officer (Lindsay McDougall) was wounded and died six days later, on 14 January.
  • 8 February: the INLA shot dead an RUC officer on My Lady's Road, Belfast.
  • 1 March: a republican hunger strike began in the Maze Prison. Four INLA and nineteen IRA prisoners would join.
  • 16 April: the INLA shot dead an off-duty UDR soldier (John Donnelly) while in The Village Inn, Moy, County Tyrone.
  • 27 April: the INLA killed an RUC officer (Gary Martin) with a booby-trap bomb hidden in a lorry at the junction of Shaw's Road and Glen Road, Andersonstown, Belfast.
  • 7 May: an INLA volunteer (James Power) was killed in a premature bomb explosion at a house on Friendly Street, Markets, Belfast.
  • 12 May: a British Army sniper shot dead an INLA volunteer (Emmanuel McClarnon), Divis Tower, Belfast.
  • 21 May: INLA prisoner Patsy O'Hara died on hunger strike in the Maze Prison.
  • 31 July: the INLA shot dead an ex-RUC officer (Thomas Harpur) while he was visiting a friend's home, Mount Sion, Ballycolman, Strabane, County Tyrone.
  • 1 August: INLA prisoner Kevin Lynch died on hunger strike in the Maze Prison.
  • 20 August: INLA prisoner Michael Devine died on hunger strike in the Maze Prison.
  • 29 September: the INLA shot dead an off-duty UDR soldier (Mark Stockman) shortly after he left his workplace, Mackie's factory, Springfield Road, Belfast.
  • 16 October: the INLA shot dead an Ulster Defence Association (UDA) member (Billy McCullough) outside his home on Denmark Street, Belfast.
  • 28 October: a civilian (Edward Brogan) was found shot dead at a rubbish dump, Shantallow, Derry; the INLA claimed he was an informer.
  • 24 November: the INLA claimed responsibility for exploding a bomb outside the British Consulate in Hamburg, West Germany.[17]
  • 25 November: the INLA claimed responsibility for exploding a bomb at a British Army base in Herford, West Germany; one British soldier was injured.[17]

References for this year:[18][19]

1982

  • 29 January: the INLA shot dead loyalist John McKeague at his shop on Albertbridge Road, Belfast.
  • 20 February: the INLA shot dead a Garda Síochána (Patrick Reynolds) at a house in Avonbeg Gardens, Tallaght, County Dublin.
  • 2 June: Patrick Smith (aged 16) was killed after inadvertently triggering an INLA booby-trap bomb attached to an abandoned motorcycle, Rugby Road, Belfast.
  • 4 June: the INLA shot dead Official IRA volunteer James Flynn on North Strand Road, Dublin, as part of a republican feud.
  • 1 September: the INLA shot Billy Dickinson, then a Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) member of Belfast City Council. Dickinson survived the attack.
  • 16 September: the INLA exploded a remote-control bomb hidden in a drainpipe as a British patrol passed Cullingtree Walk, Divis Flats, Belfast. A British soldier (Kevin Waller) and two children (Stephen Bennett and Kevin Valliday) were killed.
  • 20 September: the INLA claimed responsibility for bombing a radar station on Mount Gabriel, County Cork. Five INLA volunteers hijacked a car carrying an engineer to the station. They forced their way inside, tied-up several workers and planted the bombs. The INLA claimed it attacked the station because it was linked to NATO.[20]
  • 26 September: the INLA shot dead a civilian (William Nixon) at his home on Harland Walk, off Newtownards Road, Belfast.[why?]
  • 27 September: the INLA killed a British soldier with a booby-trap bomb attached to a security barrier on West Circular Road, Belfast.
  • 7 October: an INLA sniper killed a British Army UDR soldier (Fred Williamson), and, indirectly, a female Prison Officer (Elizabeth Chambers), in Kilmore. Williamson was shot while driving his car, which went out of control and crashed into Chambers' car, killing her.
  • 16 October: a civilian died three weeks after being shot by the INLA outside a church hall on Albertbridge Road, Belfast.
  • 18 October: an INLA shot a former UDR soldier while teaching a class at a school in Newry. In another attack, the son of prominent Loyalist Robert Overend was badly injured when an INLA bomb exploded under his vehicle on the family farm.
  • 19 October: the INLA exploded a bomb at the headquarters of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) on Glengall Street, Belfast. The building was badly damaged by the blast.
  • 16 November: the INLA shot dead two RUC officers (Ronald Irwin and Snowdon Corkey) at a security barrier in Markethill, County Armagh.
  • 30 November: an incendiary parcel bomb exploded in the 10 Downing Street offices of British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher; an official who opened the letter suffered burns. The INLA claimed responsibility.[21]
  • 6 December: Droppin Well bombing - the INLA killed 11 British soldiers and 6 civilians when it exploded a time bomb at a disco in Ballykelly, County Londonderry. The disco was frequented by British soldiers.
  • 12 December: undercover RUC officers shot dead two INLA volunteers (Seamus Grew and Rodney Carroll) at a vehicle checkpoint at Mullacreevie Park, Armagh.

References for this year:[22][23]

1983

  • 2 February: an INLA volunteer (Eugene McMonagle) was shot dead by undercover British Army officer during an altercation at Leafair Park, Shantallow, Derry.
  • 7 May: the INLA shot dead Eric Dale, one of its own members, at Clontygora, near Killeen, County Armagh as an alleged informer.
  • 26 May: the INLA shot dead an RUC officer (Colin Carson) outside the RUC base in Cookstown.
  • 4 June: a UDR soldier (Andrew Stinson) was killed by an INLA booby-trap bomb attached to a mechanical digger in a field at Eglish, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.
  • 13 July: Eamon McMahon, a civilian, was found shot dead in his car, Glasdrumman, near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.
  • 13 August: undercover RUC men shot dead two INLA members (James Mallon and Brendan Convery) as they were about to attack RUC officers in Dungannon.
  • 6 September: the INLA shot dead an RUC officer (John Wasson) outside his home at Dukes Grove, off Cathedral Road, Armagh.
  • 26 October: the INLA shot dead one of its own members (Gerard Barkley) near Redhills, County Cavan as an alleged informer.
  • 5 December: the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) shot INLA volunteer Joseph Craven dead from a passing motorcycle shortly after Craven left the Department of Health and Social Services office, Church Road, Newtownabbey, County Antrim.

References for this year:[24][25]

1984

  • 20 January: the INLA shot dead a UDR soldier (Colin Houston) at his home on Sunnymede Avenue, Dunmurry.
  • 13 April: the INLA shot dead an alleged local criminal (John George), identified by CAIN as a Catholic civilian, at his home on Thornhill Crescent, Twinbrook, Belfast.
  • 15 June: an RUC officer (Michael Todd) and an INLA volunteer (Paul McCann) were shot dead during a gun battle on Lenadoon Avenue, Belfast. The RUC had surrounded an INLA unit who had taken up position in a house.

References for this year:[26][27]

1985

  • 24 February: The INLA shot dead a former UDR soldier (Douglas McElhinney) on Glenvale Road, off Northland Road, Derry.[28]
  • 20 April: The INLA claimed responsibility for firebombing a store in Dublin which was selling South African goods in protest against the apartheid regime. There were no injuries as the building had been cleared following a telephone warning.[29]
  • 9 May : The INLA abducted and killed an ex-member of their own organisation (Seamus Ruddy) in Paris. His body has never been recovered.
  • 27 June: A Garda officer (Patrick Morrissey) was killed during the robbery of a post office in Ardee, County Louth. CAIN lists the INLA as responsible.
  • 9 September: An INLA member from County Dublin (James Burnett) was found shot dead in Killeen, County Armagh, as an alleged informer.

References for this year:[30][28]

1986

  • 28 August: The INLA claimed responsibility for bomb attacks across Northern Ireland: two car bombs exploded outside the RUC bases in Newry and Downpatrick, a third bomb exploded in a disused factory in Derry and a fourth was found under an RUC officer's car in Antrim.[31]
  • 18 September: The INLA claimed responsibility for an attempted bombing in Downpatrick. INLA members planted a 40 pounds (18 kg) suitcase bomb outside a closed pub and then sent a telephone warning. An RUC officer carried the bomb to a field about 80 yards (73 m) away, where it exploded 15 minutes later.[32]
  • 21 December : The Irish People's Liberation Organisation (IPLO) shot dead an INLA volunteer (Thomas McCartan), Commedagh Drive, Belfast. This was part of a feud between the two republican groups.[33]

1987

  • 8 January: The INLA claimed responsibility for shooting Unionist politician David Calvert as he got into his car near Portadown. Calvert survived the shooting.[citation needed]
  • 20 January: The IPLO shot dead INLA members Thomas Power and John O'Reilly in Rossnaree Hotel, Drogheda, County Louth.
  • 31 January: Mary O'Neill McGlinchey, an INLA activist and wife of INLA leader Dominic McGlinchey was shot dead at her home in Dundalk, County Louth. It has never been established who was responsible or why.
  • 5 February: The INLA shot dead a member of the IPLO (Anthony McCluskey) in Middletown, County Armagh as part of a republican feud.
  • 7 February: A civilian (Iris Farley) died five weeks after being shot by the INLA at her home in Markethill, County Armagh. The intended target of the attack was her off-duty Ulster Defence Regiment soldier son.
  • 18 February: The IPLO shot dead INLA volunteer Michael Kearney in the Ballymurphy area of Belfast as part of a republican feud.
  • 7 March: The INLA shot dead a member of the IPLO near Forkill as part of a republican feud.
  • 14 March: The INLA shot dead IRSP member Fergus Conlon near Forkill as part of a republican feud.
  • 15 March: The INLA attacked the car of IPLO member Gerard Steenson in Ballymurphy, Belfast. Steenson and his passenger (Tony McCarthy, also a member of the IPLO) were killed, as part of a republican feud.
  • 21 March: The IPLO shot dead INLA volunteer Emmanuel Gargan in the Hatfield Bar, Belfast, as part of a republican feud.
  • 22 March: The IPLO shot dead INLA volunteer Kevin Duffy in Armagh as part of a republican feud.
  • 4 October: The INLA shot dead an alleged criminal (James McDaid) and left his body in an abandoned car near Crossmaglen, County Armagh.
  • 26 November: INLA member Martin Bryan was shot dead by the Gardaí at a checkpoint in Urlingford, County Kilkenny.
  • 8 December: A civilian (Patrick Cunningham) was found shot dead in an outbuilding at an unoccupied farm, Errybane, near Castleblayney, County Monaghan on 8 December 1987. He had been abducted in May 1987. It is believed the killing was related to the INLA/IPLO feud.

References for this year:[34][35]

1988

  • 10 August: The British Army shot dead INLA member James McPhilemy during a gun battle at a vehicle checkpoint in Clady, County Tyrone.
  • 17 August: The INLA shot dead an ex-member of the UVF (Frederick Otley) at his shop on Shankill Road, Belfast.

References for this year:[36][37]

1990s

1990

  • 22 November : Undercover British soldiers shot dead INLA volunteer Alexander Patterson as he tried to assassinate an off-duty soldier in Strabane.[38]

1991

  • 29 June: The INLA shot dead one of its own members (Gerard Burns), as an alleged informer. Burns' body was found at the back of a house in New Barnsley Park, Ballymurphy, Belfast.
  • 21 December: The INLA shot dead Robin Farmer at his family's shop, Killyman Street, Moy. His ex-RUC officer was the intended target.

References for this year:[39][40]

1992

  • 13 April : The INLA shot a British soldier (Michael Newman) outside a recruiting office in Derby, England. He died of his wounds the following day.[41][42]
  • June: Nine incendiary devices were planted in various stores in Leeds, England. Four of the devices went off, causing over £50,000 worth of damages.[citation needed]

1993

  • 14 January: The INLA claimed responsibility for attempting to kill prominent loyalist John "Bunter" Graham. He was hit by rifle shots fired through the window of his home in the Shankill area of Belfast but survived.[43]
  • 21 January: The INLA shot dead a civilian (Samuel Rock) at his home on Rosewood Street, Lower Oldpark, Belfast, claiming that he was a UDA member. Rock's family denied the claim. It was reported that Rock had recently purchased a car from a loyalist in the Shankill area and the killing may thus have been a case of mistaken identity. CAIN lists Rock as a Protestant civilian.[44]
  • 17 June: A retired RUC officer (John Patrick Murphy) was shot dead by INLA gunmen while inside York Hotel, Botanic Avenue, Belfast.[28]

References for this year:[45][46]

1994

  • 10 February: Dominic McGlinchey, the INLA's former Chief of Staff, was shot dead by unknown gunman/gunmen in Drogheda.
  • 24 February: The INLA shot dead a security guard (Jack Smyth) at the entrance to Bob Cratchits Bar, Lisburn Road, Belfast. The INLA claimed he was linked to the UDA/UFF, but CAIN lists Smyth as a civilian.[47]
  • 27 April : The INLA shot dead a Protestant civilian (Gerald Evans) at his shop, Northcott Shopping Centre, Ballyclare Road, Glengormley, County Antrim.[why?]
  • 3 May : The INLA shot dead a civilian (Thomas Douglas) outside his workplace, Northern Ireland Electricity Headquarters, Northern Ireland Electricity Headquarters, Stranmillis Road, Malone, Belfast. The INLA claimed he was a high-ranking loyalist but CAIN lists Douglas as a civilian.[47]
  • 16 June: 1994 Shankill Road Killings - The INLA shot dead three UVF members (Trevor King, Colin Craig, David Hamilton) in a gun attack on Shankill Road, Belfast.

References for this year:[48][49]

1996

  • 30 January: The INLA shot dead one of its leaders, Gino Gallagher, inside Department of Health and Social Services office on Falls Road, Belfast, in the course of an internal dispute.
  • 5 March: INLA volunteer John Fennell was beaten to death by other INLA volunteers in Bundoran, County Donegal, in the course of an internal dispute.
  • 15 March: The INLA shot dead Barbara McAlorum in Ashfield Gardens, Belfast. Her relative was the intended target, in the course of an INLA internal dispute.
  • 25 May: INLA volunteer Dessie McCleery was shot dead by other INLA volunteers on Bankmore Street, Belfast, in the course of an internal dispute.
  • 9 June: INLA volunteer Francis Shannon was shot dead by other INLA volunteers in the Turf Lodge area of Belfast, in the course of an internal dispute.
  • 3 September: INLA volunteer Hugh Torney was shot dead by other INLA volunteers in Lurgan, in the course of an internal dispute.

References for this year:[50][51]

1997

  • 9 May: The INLA shot dead a suspended RUC officer (Darren Bradshaw) as he drank with friends in the Parliament Bar, frequented by members of Belfast's gay community.
  • 4 June: INLA volunteer John Morris was shot dead by the Gardaí during an armed robbery in Inchicore, Dublin.
  • 7 July: INLA gunmen fired on British soldiers in Ardoyne, Belfast as part of the widespread violence that followed Mo Mowlam's decision over the Drumcree parade. See 1997 nationalist riots in Northern Ireland.[52]
  • 27 December: INLA prisoners shot dead Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) leader and fellow prisoner Billy Wright inside Maze Prison.[53]

References for this year:[54][55]

1998

  • 1 January: A home in Newtownbutler belonging to a member of the RUC was sprayed with gunfire by an INLA unit.[56]
  • 19 January: The INLA shot dead UDA leader Jim Guiney at his carpet shop in Dunmurry.
  • 28 February: INLA volunteers launched a hand grenade attack on RUC officers at Hazelwood Integrated College, Belfast.
  • 27 March: The INLA shot dead an ex-member of the RUC (Cyril Stewart) outside a supermarket, off Dobbin Street Lane, Armagh.
  • 8 April: The INLA shot dead Trevor Deeny, an ex-member of the UVF and Derry leader of the Loyalist Volunteer Force, outside his home, Hillhampton, off Rossdowney Road, Kilfennan, County Londonderry.
  • 17 April: The INLA shot dead a former INLA volunteer, taxi driver Mark McNeill, while he was getting out of his car, outside taxi depot, Shaws Road, Anderstown, Belfast.
  • 24 June: The INLA exploded a 200 lb car bomb in the centre of Newtownhamilton. The group issued a 50-minute warning about the bomb, but six people were wounded.
  • 22 August: After a 24-year campaign, the INLA declared a ceasefire.

References for this year:[57][58]

1999

  • 8 August: The INLA stated that "There is no political or moral argument to justify a resumption of the campaign".[citation needed]
  • 10 October: INLA volunteer Patrick Campbell was killed in a confrontation with a criminal gang in Dublin. The event dubbed the "Ballymount Bloodbath" saw the INLA tie up and torture a criminal gang before associates of the gang entered armed with machetes to free them. Campbell was stabbed and bled to death.

References for this year:[59][60]

2000s

2000

  • 29 April: The INLA shot dead Patrick Neville on stairway in block of flats, near to his home, St. Michael's estate, Inchicore, Dublin. The INLA claimed he was part of the gang responsible for killing Patrick Campbell earlier.[61]

2001

  • 12 December: A male civilian from Dublin (Derek Lenehan) died several hours after being found shot in the legs by the INLA at the side of New Road, near Forkhill, County Armagh. Reason unknown.[62]

2007

  • 3 June: The INLA claimed responsibility for the shooting dead of a doorman/bouncer and known drug dealer, Brian McGlynn, in Derry. However, it was reported that "[D]espite the INLA's claim, some security and republican sources continue to suspect the Provisional IRA had a role in the murder. They said McGlynn's behaviour had upset the Provisional IRA in recent weeks."[63]

2009

  • 15 February: The INLA shot dead an alleged drug dealer, Jim McConnell, in Derry.[64]
  • 19 August: The INLA shot and wounded a man in Derry. The INLA claimed that the man was involved in drug dealing although the injured man and his family denied the allegation.[65] However, in a newspaper article on 28 August the victim retracted his previous statement and admitted he had been involved in small scale drug-dealing but had since ceased these activities.[66]
  • 11 October: Speaking at the graveside of one of its founding members in Bray, the INLA formally announced an end to its armed campaign, stating that the current situation allows it pursue its goals through peaceful political means.[67]

2010

  • 8 February : It was announced that the INLA had put its weapons out of commission.

2013

  • 21 March: Sinn Féin blamed elements close to the INLA for shooting two men in the legs in Derry, and urged those close to the INLA to pass on any information they have.[68]

See also

References

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  4. McKittrick, p. 677
  5. McKittrick, p. 695
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  31. "Ulster is rocked by bomb blitz". Evening Times. 28 August 1986.
  32. "Ulster officer risks life, removes bomb". Schenectady Gazette. 19 September 1986.
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