Arne Berge

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search

Arne Berge (29 June 1908 – 13 August 1988) was a Norwegian priest. He was seamen's priest in Hamburg during World War II, when he also worked among Scandinavian prisoners in Germany, and helped planning and carrying out the White Buses operation.

Personal life

Berge was born in Stavanger as the son of stereotyper Alfred Berge and Albertine Husebø.[1]

Career

Berge finished his examen artium in 1928, and graduated as cand.theol. in 1934. He was assistant priest in Modum from 1935 to 1936. From 1937 to 1940 he was a priest in Oslo.[1] He was seamen's priest in Hamburg during the Second World War, taking over the position after Finn Moestue Husebye, when Huseby had to leave Hamburg because of a conflict with Nazi-friendly Norwegian settlers in Germany. Together with his assistant priest Conrad Vogt-Svendsen he also worked among Scandinavian prisoners in Nazi Germany, making thousands of visits on behalf of the prisoners' families.[2] They distributed large quantities of clothes and food to prisoners all over Germany.[3] Berge and Vogt-Svendsen compiled extensive lists of prisons and prisoners, which were sent to Stockholm and later used as a basis for the White Buses operation in Spring 1945.[4] They also passed on information on planned mass liquidation of concentration camp prisoners towards the end of the war.[5] The seamen's church in Hamburg remained intact until Easter 1945, when it was destroyed in a bomb attack on the Good Friday, an attack which killed the church's caretaker Oskar M. Olsen.[6]

Berge was decorated Knight, First class of the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav in 1945, for his work for prisoners in Germany. He was also awarded the Danish King Christian X's Liberty Medal.[1] He was a priest at Ilebu prison from 1946, and priest in Horten from 1950.[7] He died in August 1988.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Amundsen, O. Delphin (1947). Den kongelige norske Sankt Olavs Orden (in Norwegian). Oslo: Grøndahl. p. 488.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Hjeltnes, Guri (1995). "Sjømannsprestene i Hamburg". In Dahl, Hjeltnes, Nøkleby, Ringdal, Sørensen (ed.). Norsk krigsleksikon 1940-45 (in Norwegian). Oslo: Cappelen. p. 381. ISBN 82-02-14138-9. Retrieved 14 October 2009.CS1 maint: multiple names: editors list (link) CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Vogt-Svendsen, Conrad (1948). "Tukthus og fengsler. Forsyninger". Med Guds ord i fiendeland (in Norwegian). Bergen: Den norske sjømannsmisjons forlag. pp. 101–107.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Sander, Thorbjørn Johan. "Conrad Vogt-Svendsen". In Helle, Knut (ed.). Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 16 October 2009.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Vogt-Svendsen, Conrad (1948). "Svenskene kommer". Med Guds ord i fiendeland (in Norwegian). Bergen: Den norske sjømannsmisjons forlag. pp. 142–146.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Heger, Wanda (1984). Hver fredag foran porten (in Norwegian). Oslo: Gyldendal.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Flottorp, Haakon (1972). "Berge, Arne". In Bull, Eskeland, Tandberg (ed.). Gyldendals store konversasjonsleksikon (in Norwegian). 1 (3 ed.). Oslo: Gyldendal. ISBN 82-05-00267-3.CS1 maint: multiple names: editors list (link) CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>