Augustus Paget (RAF officer)

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Augustus Paget
Born 1898
Bromham, Wiltshire, England
Died 30 October 1918 (aged 19–20) 
Fontanafredda, Italy
Buried at Fontanafredda Communal Cemetery, Pordenone, Italy (Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found.)
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch British Army
Royal Air Force
Rank Second Lieutenant
Unit No. 66 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars World War I
 • Italian Front
Awards Distinguished Flying Cross

Second Lieutenant Augustus Paget was a British World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories.[1]

Biography

Augustus Paget was one of 13 children born to George Lewis Paget (b. 1849), of Kenilworth Farm, Bromham, Wiltshire, and his wife Harriet Miriam.[1][2]

Paget served in the 27th Territorial Reserve Battalion, before transferring to the Royal Flying Corps.[1] On 10 September 1917 he was sent to the 1st Officer Cadet Wing for basic military training. He attended No 1 School of Military Aeronautics from 13 October, and No. 2 School of Military Aeronautics from 2 November.[3] From cadet he was commissioned as a temporary second lieutenant (on probation) on 1 January 1918.[4]

On 2 February 1918 he was assigned to No. 35 Wing, and posted to No. 1 Training Depot Station. He was transferred to No. 63 Training Depot Station on 20 March,[3] and was confirmed in his rank on 25 May.[5] Paget was posted to No. 2 Flying School on 24 June, and on 10 August was assigned to No. 14 Wing, and on 15 August to No. 66 Squadron[3][6] in Italy.

He gained his first aerial victory on 15 September when he destroyed a Berg D.I north-east of Feltre. On 25 October he was credited with two Hansa-Brandenburg C.I reconnaissance aircraft driven down out of control west of Feltre, one solo, and one shared with Lieutenant Darrell Joseph Tepoorten. On 27 October he destroyed an observation balloon, and the next day shot down in flames two Albatros D.V fighters over Godega aerodrome.[1][7] On 30 October his aircraft was shot down over Fontanafredda by anti-aircraft fire, and he was killed.[1]

Paget is buried in the Communal Cemetery in Fontanafredda,[8] and is also commemorated, alongside his older brothers Edwin and Colin, on a memorial plaque at Saint Nicholas' Church at Bromham.[9]

Paget's award of the Distinguished Flying Cross was gazetted posthumously on 1 January 1919.[7][10]

References

Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "Augustus Paget". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Gathering of Paget's clan in Bromham". Wiltshire Gazette & Herald. 10 April 2013. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Grech, John (2015). "Summary life history of Officers (P)". 66 Squadron, RFC & RAF, 1916 to 1919. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Royal Flying Corps: Appointments". Flight. X (472): 51. 10 January 1918. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. The London Gazette: no. 30771. pp. 7644–7645. 28 June 1918.
  6. "First World War : Pathway to Pilot". RAF Museum. 2015. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. 7.0 7.1 Shores (1990), p. 296.
  8. "Casualty Details: Paget, Augustus". Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 2015. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Ball, Duncan & Mandy (10 July 2007). "Memorials (P-Z) at St. Nicholas, Bromham". War Memorials and Rolls of Honour in Wiltshire. Retrieved 28 July 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 31098. p. 96. 31 December 1918.
Bibliography
  • Shores, Christopher F.; Franks, Norman & Guest, Russell F. (1990). Above the Trenches: a Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915–1920. London, UK: Grub Street. ISBN 978-0-948817-19-9.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>