Chichester Theological College

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Chichester Theological College
Bishop Otter Campus of the University of Chichester, formerly the site of the college
Bishop Otter Campus of the University of Chichester, formerly the site of the college
Street Map of Chichester
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OS grid reference SU8560604812
Location Chichester
Country UK
Denomination Anglican
Churchmanship High Anglican
History
Founded July 1838 (1838-07)
Founder(s) William Otter
Dedication St Richard of Chichester
Dedicated 1 May 1919
Associated people Charles Marriott
William Otter
William Awdry
Architecture
Status Closed
Heritage designation Grade II Listed[1]
Designated 5 July 1950
Architect(s) Ahrends, Burton & Koralek
Closed 1994
Administration
Parish St Paul's, Chichester
Archdeaconry Chichester
Diocese Chichester
Province Canterbury

Chichester Theological College (1838–1994) was an Anglican theological college for the Diocese of Chichester in Sussex, England.[2] Its churchmanship was high church and Anglo-Catholic.

History

It was founded by William Otter in July 1838, the first such Diocesan college in England. Charles Marriott of Oriel College, Oxford was its first principal and the first donation, of £50, for the college was from W. E. Gladstone.[3]

From 1886, during Josiah Sanders Teulon's time as principal, the college experienced a gradual decline in students. This was exacerbated in 1899, when he resigned, but retained his income as a resident canon. At a meeting of the college council, it was resolved to close the college. However, the vice-principal made a successful case for continuing and Herbert Rickard was appointed the new principal.

In 1903, a hostel in West Street, Chichester was bought for £1000 by the college council, the balance being paid by the principal in memory of his wife. This was refitted and became the college headquarters. This hostel was sold in 1919 and the proceeds went towards the purchase of new headquarters in Westgate, Chichester for £3500. On 1 May 1919, the college was formally re-opened by Bishop Charles Ridgeway (his last episcopal act) and was dedicated to St Richard of Chichester.

During the Second World War the college was forced to move temporarily to Cambridge, while its buildings in Chichester were used by the military authorities. At the end of the War, the college buildings were sold, except for Marriott House, which was used to house the re-opened college from 21 October 1946.[4]

Closure

After its closure in 1994, its theological library was transferred to the University of Chichester.[5] In addition, St Bartholomew's Chapel, which served as the chapel to the theological college is now the chaplaincy building of Chichester College.[6]

List of Principals

Notable alumni

References

  1. British Listed Buildings
  2. The Burgon Society
  3. "Rt. Rev. William Otter - CNHS's Web Site". Colmworthhistory.org.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. National Archives
  5. "Special Collections | University of Chichester". Chi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. http://www.churches-uk-ireland.org/towns/c/chichester.html Status of churches in Chichester
  7. "Access to Archives". The National Archives. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "An early history - ST BARTHOLOMEW BRIGHTON". Stbartholomewsbrighton.org.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Denis Larionov & Alexander Zhulin. "A history of Pembroke college, Oxford, anciently Broadgates hall, in which are incorporated short historical notices of the more eminent members of this house, by Douglas Macleane". Ebooksread.com. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Page 32". Ccel.org. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. "Full text of Alumni Cantabrigienses; a biographical list of all known students, graduates and holders of office at the University of Cambridge, from the earliest times to 1900". Archive.org. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. Scottish Episcopal Clergy, ed. Bertie, David (2001). Continuum Publishing. ISBN 0567087468
  13. Kemp, Eric (2006). Shy But Not Retiring: Memoirs. Continuum Publishing. ISBN 978-0826480736
  14. "Bishop Clark Discusses Statement On Ministry - from the Catholic Herald Archive". Archive.catholicherald.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. "John Halliburton". Trushare.com. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. "John Hind (Lord Bishop) | University of Chichester". Chi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2012-08-12.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>

External links