Dmitry Sadovnikov

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Dmitry Nikolayevich Sadovnikov
File:Dmitrij Nikolaevich Sadovnikov - portrait.jpg
Born Дмитрий Николаевич Садовников
(1847-05-07)May 7, 1847
Ryazan, Russian Empire
Died December 31, 1883(1883-12-31) (aged 36)
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Occupation poet, folklorist, ethnographer
Spouse(s) Varvara Lazareva

Dmitry Nikolayevich Sadovnikov (Дмитрий Николаевич Садовников, 7 May 1847 in Simbirsk, Russian Empire – 31 December 1883 in Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire) was a Russian poet, folklorist and ethnographer. Among his major works were acclaimed compilations "The Mysteries of Russian People" (1876), "The Pagan Dreams of Russia" (1882) and "Fables and Legends of the Samara Region" (1884).[1]

The poetic legacy of Sadovnikov who died in poverty and has never received wide recognition, is generally underrated. For one, D.S. Mirsky claimed him to be "the second Russian poet of the 1870s after Nekrasov, worth a mention."[2] Sadovnikov has never received due credit even for his most famous poem, "Iz-za ostrova na strezhen". Set to a popular folk melody, this piece about ataman Stenka Razin is widely considered to be part of Russian musical folklore.[3][4]

References

  1. Agafonov, N. "Sadovnikov, Dmitry Nikolayevich". Zavolzhskaya Biblioteka // biografija.ru. Retrieved 2015-01-13.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Prince D. S. Mirsky, Francis James Whitfield: A history of Russian literature from its beginnings to 1900. Northwestern University Press, 1958, С. 244. ISBN 978-0-8101-1679-5. (English)
  3. Korolyov, V.N. "Has Stepan Razin Really Drowned a Princess?". Razdory Ethnography Museum site. Retrieved 2015-01-13.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Rozanov, Ivan. From Book to Folklore. How poems become folk songs. Literaturny Kritik. No.4, 1935 // От книги в фольклор. Какие стихи становятся популярной песней. // "Литературный критик 4 (1935). Pp. 2-3.

External links