Georgy Vasilyevich Ivanov

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Georgy Vasilyevich Ivanov
Native name Георгий Васильевич Иванов
Born 25 May 1901
Upornikovsky Farm, Hoperskogo District, Don Host Oblast, Russian Empire
Died 24 December 2001
Moscow, Russia
Buried at Troyekurovskoye Cemetery
Allegiance  Soviet Union
Service/branch Soviet Army
Years of service 1919–1950
Rank Major general
Commands held 6th Guards Rifle Division
Battles/wars Russian Civil War

World War II

Awards Hero of the Soviet UnionOrder of Lenin (2)

Order of Zhukov
Order of Honour
Order of the Red Banner (4)
Order of Suvorov 2nd class
Order of Kutuzov 2nd class
Order of the Patriotic War 1st class
Legion of Merit
Czechoslovak War Cross
Virtuti Militari
Order of the Cross of Grunwald 3rd class

Patriotic Order of Merit

Georgy Vasilyevich Ivanov (Russian: Георгий Васильевич Иванов; 25 May 1901 – 25 December 2001) was a Soviet Army major general and Hero of the Soviet Union. Ivanov was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and the Order of Lenin for his leadership of the 6th Guards Rifle Division from late 1944 to 1945. Ivanov fought in World War II at the Battle of the Dnieper and the Vistula–Oder Offensive.[1][2]

Early life

Georgy Ivanov was born on 25 May 1901 on a farm near Upornikovsky in the Hoperskogo District of the Don Host Oblast to a peasant family. In 1911, Ivanov's father died of his war wounds from the Russo-Japanese War. He graduated from elementary school. In 1919, Ivanov joined the Red Army. He served in the Russian Civil War on the Don River as a private in the 5th Amur Cossack Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Army.[1] After the withdrawal of the reserve regiment, Ivanov fell ill with typhus and spent two months in the hospital. After recovering, he returned to the front and fought battles near Novocherkassk.[3]

Interwar

In 1920, Ivanov graduated from the Novocherkassk Red Commanders Courses. He was sent to the 4th Cavalry Division. In 1923, he was transferred to the 19th Cavalry Regiment and became a platoon commander. Ivanov was sent to the Kiev United Military School in 1924. After graduating in 1926, he became a squadron commander.[3] In 1927, he joined the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Ivanov was sent to Mongolia and became an advisor with the Mongolian People's Army. In 1937, Ivanov graduated from the Military Academy of Mechanization and Motorization. He was promoted to Major and became a regimental commander in the 7th Cavalry Division. In 1940, he graduated from the Military Academy of the General Staff. After graduation, Ivanov became an officer in the Belorussian Direction of the General Staff.[1]

World War II

On 22 June, the German invasion of the Soviet Union, Operation Barbarossa, began. By 27 June, the Red Army General Staff had almost no reliable information from the Belorussian Special Military District. To clarify the situation, Ivanov flew in a Ilyushin Il-4 escorted by two fighters to meet with front commander Dmitry Pavlov. After flying over two German tank columns, Ivanov's aircraft landed at the headquarters of the 3rd Long-range Bomber Aviation Corps. On 29 July, his aircraft took off in another attempt to find Pavlov's headquarters but was shot down. Ivanov and the crew received shrapnel wounds. Ivanov was evacuated to Moscow for treatment.[3] After leaving the hospital, he taught at the Frunze Military Academy and participated in the defence of Moscow, helping to erect fortifications near Poklonnaya Hill during September. He was evacuated along with the academy to Central Asia. In March 1942, Ivanov became the chief of staff of the 24th Rifle Corps, part of the 60th Army. He fought in the Battle of the Dnieper during September 1943. For his actions during the battle, Ivanov was awarded the Order of the Red Banner on 20 September.[4] He then fought in the Battle of Kiev.[1]

In January 1944, Ivanov became the chief of staff of the 27th Rifle Corps, part of the 13th Army. On 10 January, he was awarded the Order of Suvorov 2nd class.[5] On 2 September, he was awarded the Order of the Red Banner.[6] Ivanov was promoted to command of the 6th Guards Rifle Division on 3 September.[1] Ivanov led the division during the Vistula–Oder Offensive. On 26 January 1945, the division crossed the Oder near Steinau an der Oder and seized a bridgehead on its left bank. Within three days, the division reportedly repulsed all German counterattacks and expanded the bridgehead, reportedly inflicting heavy losses on German troops. Ivanov was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union[7] and the Order of Lenin on 6 April for his leadership in the Vistula-Oder Offensive.[2] The division then fought in the Berlin Offensive, capturing Zahna on 22 April.[1] The division was then transferred to fight in the Prague Offensive. Ivanov ended the war in Prague. He was awarded the Order of Kutuzov 2nd class on 25 May.[8] On 27 June, he was promoted to major general.[9] In the Moscow Victory Parade of 1945, Ivanov commanded a battalion.[3]

Postwar

Postwar, Ivanov served in command positions in the 13th Army. He was transferred to the Belorussian Military District and in 1948 became a senior lecturer at the Frunze Military Academy. In 1950, he retired.[3] He lived in Moscow. He was awarded the Order of the Patriotic War 1st class on 6 April 1985 on the 40th anniversary of the end of World War II.[10] On 4 May 1995, he was awarded the Order of Zhukov. Ivanov was awarded the Order of Honour on 19 February 2001 for his work on the "social protection of veterans and military-patriotic education of children". He died on 24 December 2001 and was buried in Troyekurovskoye Cemetery.[1]

Personal life

Ivanov married Nina Trifonovna, a medical worker. He had a son, Viktor Ivanov,[11] who became a Soviet Army colonel.[3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 "Иванов Георгий Васильевич" [Ivanov Georgy Vasilyevich]. www.warheroes.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2016-01-14.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 Shkadov, I.N. (1988). Герои Советского Союза: Краткий биографический словарь [Heroes of the Soviet Union: A Brief Biographical Dictionary] (in Russian). Moscow: Voenizdat. ISBN 5203005362.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 "ИВАНОВ Георгий Васильевич" [Ivanov Georgy Vasilyevich]. wwii-soldat.narod.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2016-01-15.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Order No. 198 Central Front, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  5. 1st Ukrainian Front award list for 10 January 1944, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  6. Order of the Red Banner citation, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  7. Hero of the Soviet Union citation, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  8. Order of Kutuzov 2nd class award list, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  9. "Biography of Major-General Georgii Vasilevich Ivanov – (Георгий Васильевич Иванов) (1901–2001), Soviet Union". generals.dk. Retrieved 2016-01-16.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. TsAMO Anniversary card file, available online at pamyat-naroda.ru
  11. "Век генерала Иванова" [Century General Ivanov]. old.redstar.ru (in Russian). Krasnaya Zvezda. Retrieved 2016-01-16.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>