Konstantin Provalov

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Konstantin Ivanovich Provalov
File:Konstantin Provalov.jpg
Native name Константин Иванович Провалов
Born 11 June 1906
Babushkino village, Balagansky Uyezd, Irkutsk Governorate, Russian Empire
Died 10 December 1981
Moscow, Soviet Union
Buried at Novodevichy Cemetery
Allegiance  Soviet Union
Service/branch Soviet Army
Years of service 1928–1981
Rank Colonel general
Commands held 383rd Rifle Division

16th Rifle Corps
113th Rifle Corps
36th Rifle Corps
3rd Guards Rifle Corps
9th Guards Rifle Corps
13th Rifle Corps
31st Special Rifle Corps
4th Army

Southern Group of Forces
Battles/wars Sino-Soviet conflict (1929)

Battle of Lake Khasan
World War II

Awards Hero of the Soviet UnionOrder of Lenin (4)

Order of the Red Banner (3)
Order of Suvorov 1st class
Order of Suvorov 2nd class (2)
Order of Kutuzov 2nd class
Order of the Red Star
Order for Service to the Homeland in the Armed Forces of the USSR 3rd class
Order of the Flag of the Republic of Hungary

Order of the Red Banner (Mongolia)

Konstantin Ivanovich Provalov (Russian: Константин Иванович Провалов; 11 June 1906 – 10 December 1981) was a Soviet Army Colonel general and Hero of the Soviet Union. Provalov was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and the Order of Lenin for his leadership of a regiment in the Battle of Lake Khasan. After Operation Barbarossa, Provalov became the commander of the 383rd Rifle Division. He led the division during the Battle of the Caucasus. In 1943, he became commander of the 16th Rifle Corps and fought in the Kerch–Eltigen Operation and Crimean Offensive. In May 1944, Provalov transferred to command the 113th Rifle Corps and led it during the Vitebsk–Orsha Offensive. In July he became commander of 36th Rifle Corps, which fought in the Minsk Offensive, the Gumbinnen Operation, the Battle of Königsberg and the Prague Offensive. Postwar, Probalov led the 3rd Guards Rifle Corps, 9th Guards Rifle Corps, 13th Rifle Corps and 31st Special Rifle Corps. In 1958, he became commander of the 4th Army. From 1962 to 1968 he led the Southern Group of Forces. Provalov died on 10 December 1981 in Moscow.[1]

Early life

Provalov was born on 11 June 1906 in Babushkino village in Irkutsk Governorate in the family of a miner. He was a cousin of Double Hero of the Soviet Union Afanasy Beloborodov. He graduated from seven grades and worked as a land surveyor.[2] He later became chairman of the village Selsoviet.[1][3][4]

Interwar

Provalov was drafted into the Red Army in September 1928. In 1929, he graduated from the regimental school of the 39th Rifle Division's 117th Rifle Regiment. Provalov became an assistant platoon commander and fought in the Sino-Soviet conflict over the Chinese Eastern Railway between September and November. He was wounded during the fighting. In 1930, he joined the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Provalov graduated from the Irkutsk Infantry School in 1931.[5] In December of that year, he became a platoon leader in the regiment. He then became a company commander and later commanded the division's separate machine gun company. In 1933, he graduated from the Omsk Military School. In November 1937, Provalov became chief of staff of the 40th Rifle Division's 120th Rifle Regiment. He became the regimental commander in July 1938.[1][2]

Provalov led the regiment in the Battle of Lake Khasan between July and August 1938. The regiment defeated Japanese troops on Zaozyornaya Hill. Provalov was reportedly wounded twice but continued to lead the regiment. On 25 October 1938, Provalov was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and the Order of Lenin for his leadership. He was also promoted to the rank of Colonel. In April 1939, he was sent to the Frunze Military Academy and graduated from there in 1941.[1][2]

World War II

In August 1941, Provalov was sent to Donetsk to form the 383rd Rifle Division. Provalov led the division in the defence of Donetsk but was forced to retreat in October. The division then fought in the Battle of Rostov during November. Provalov was wounded in the fighting. Provalov was promoted to Major general on 27 March 1942. In the summer of 1942, the division defended the approaches to Tuapse during the Battle of the Caucasus. [1] In January 1943, the division fought in the Krasnodar Offensive.[2]

In June 1943, Provalov became commander of the 16th Rifle Corps. On 25 October 1943, he was awarded the Order of the Red Banner.[6] The corps fought in the Kerch–Eltigen Operation in November 1943. The corps then fought in battles to expand the bridgehead until March 1944. In April, it fought in the Crimean Offensive and captured Kerch, Feodosia, Alushta, Yalta, Alupka and Balaklava.[7] On 20 April, he was awarded the Order of the Red Star for 15 years of service.[8] On 11 May, Provalov was awarded the Order of Suvorov 1st class.[9] At the end of May, Provalov became commander of the 31st Army's 113th Rifle Corps. He led the corps in the Vitebsk–Orsha Offensive. In July, he was transferred to command the army's 36th Rifle Corps. The corps fought in the Minsk Offensive and the Belostock Offensive during the summer. On 3 July, he was awarded the Order of Kutuzov 2nd class.[10] On 8 July, Provalov was recommended for a second award of the title Hero of the Soviet Union by 31st Army commander Vasily Glagolev, but 3rd Belorussian Front Commander Ivan Chernyakhovsky downgraded the award to the Order of Suvorov 2nd class.[11] In October, the corps fought in the Gumbinnen Operation.[1][2]

During January and February 1945, the corps fought in the East Prussian Offensive. During the offensive, the corps crossed the Neman and was awarded the honorific "Neman". Provalov was awarded the Order of the Red Banner for his leadership. In April 1945, the corps was transferred with the 31st Army to the 1st Ukrainian Front and fought in the Prague Offensive.[1][2] On 19 April 1945, Provalov was awarded a second Order of Suvorov 2nd class for his leadership.[12]

Postwar

In July 1945, Provalov became commander of the 3rd Guards Rifle Corps. In April 1947, he became commander of the 9th Guards Rifle Corps. Provalov was sent to the Military Academy of the General Staff in December 1948 and graduated in 1950. On 5 November 1949, he was promoted to Lieutenant general. In February 1952, he was assigned to the 2nd Main Directorate of the General Staff. In December 1952, he became head of combat training for the Transcaucasian Military District. Provalov became commander of the 13th Rifle Corps in December 1953. In 1956, the corps became the 31st Special Rifle Corps. In October 1957, it was renamed the 31st Special Army Corps.[13] In January 1958, Provalov became commander of the 4th Army. He became first deputy commander of the Carpathian Military District in June 1959. In May 1961, he was promoted to colonel general. Provalov commanded the Southern Group of Forces in Hungary from September 1962. In the summer of 1968, he helped plan Operation Danube, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.[14] In October 1969, he became a deputy chief inspector of the Ministry of Defence. Provalov became an adviser with the Group of Inspectors General in August 1973. On 6 Mauy 1974, Provalov became an honorary citizen of Sevastopol.[15] He died on 10 December 1981 and was buried in Novodevichy Cemetery.[1][2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Hero of the Soviet Union medal.png  Konstantin Provalov at the "Герои страны" ("Heroes of the Country") website (Russian)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "Провалов Константин Тванович" [Provalov Konstantin Ivanovich]. encyclopedia.mil.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2016-02-08.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Kuznetsov, Ilya (1982). Золотые звезды иркутян [Gold Stars of Irkutsk] (in Russian). Irkutsk: East Siberian Book Publishing House.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "Провалов, Константин, Иванович" [Provalov Konstantin Ivanovich]. pamyatnaroda.mil.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 2016-02-11.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Glantz, David M.; House, Jonathan Mallory (2009-01-01). Armageddon in Stalingrad: September–November 1942. University Press of Kansas. ISBN 9780700616640.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Order of the Red Banner citation, 25 October 1943, available online at pamyatnaroda.mil.ru
  7. Forczyk, Robert (2014-09-20). Where the Iron Crosses Grow: The Crimea 1941–44. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 9781782009764.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Order of the Red Star award list, 20 April 1944, available online at pamyatnaroda.mil.ru
  9. Order of Suvorov 1st class award list, 11 May 1944, available online at pamyatnaroda.mil.ru
  10. Order of Kutuzov 2nd class award list, 3 July 1944, available online at pamyatnaroda.mil.ru
  11. Order of Suvorov 2nd class citation, 2 August 1944, available online at podvignaroda.ru
  12. Order of Suvorov 2nd class citation, 19 April 1945, available online at pamyatnaroda.mil.ru
  13. Holm, Michael. "31st Army Corps". www.ww2.dk. Retrieved 2016-02-10.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. Navrátil, Jaromír (1998-01-01). The Prague Spring 1968: A National Security Archive Documents Reader. Central European University Press. ISBN 9789639116153.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. "Провалов Константин Иванович" [Provalov Konstantin Ivanovich]. sevastopol.su (in Russian). ForPost Sevastopol News Portal. Retrieved 2016-02-11.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  • Provalov, Konstantin (1981). В огне передовых линий [In the Advance Fire Line] (in Russian). Moscow: Voenizdat.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>