Oktyabr (magazine)

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Oktyabr
Editor-in-chief Irina Barmetova
Categories Literary magazine
Frequency Monthly
Year founded 1924; 98 years ago (1924)
Country Soviet Union
Russia
Based in Moscow
Language Russian
ISSN 0132-0637
OCLC number 643669233

Oktyabr (meaning October in English) is a monthly Russian literary magazine, based in Moscow.[1] In addition to Novy Mir and Znamya the monthly is a leading and deep-rooted literary magazine in Russia.[2]

History

Oktyabr was launched in 1924 by a group with the same name, "Oktyabr", which was founded by the poet Alexander Bezymensky and the novelist Yury Libedinsky in 1922.[3] It was an official and conservative magazine of the Soviet Union.[4][5] Particularly during the post-World War II period it became one of the most pro-government publications and was instrumental in shaping the image of Soviet poetry.[6]

The editorial board of the magazine in the Soviet era included those figures recognized by the state.[6] The first chief editor was Labory Kalmanson who was also known as G. Lelevich.[3] Fyodor Ivanovich served as chief editor of the monthly for two times (from 1931 to 1954, and then from 1957 to 1961).[6] Vsevolod Kochetov was one of the magazine's chief editors in the 1960s.[7] In the same period, the monthly was a fierce critic of Nikita Khrushchev's reforms, adopting a Stalinist stance.[8] Anatoly Ananiev replaced Kochetov as chief editor of Oktyabr.[8] The current editor-in-chief is Irina Barmetova.[9]

The magazine awards the Oktyabr prize.[10] The 2013 winners were Andrey Bitov for the story "Something with love... ", director Leonid Heifetz for his article "Flashes" and poet Lev Kozlowski for a selection of verses "Sukhoy Bridge".[11]

Content

Oktyabr has serialized various novels, published poems and other articles about movies and societal issues. Due to such a wide coverage, the magazine is compared to the 19th century edition of Edinburgh Review.[2] in the late 1970s, Anatoly Rybakov’s novel, Heavy Sands, was serialized in the monthly.[12] Life and Fate, a novel written by Vasily Grossman, was first published in the magazine in 1988.[1][4] This novel was one of the forbidden literary works in the country and therefore, the magazine became among the publications publishing previously forbidden books in the glasnost period.[8] In 2006, the magazine published Vasili Aksyonov's novel Moskva-kva-kva.[13] The monthly also published poems of significant and state-recognized poets in the Soviet era, forming the image of Soviet poetry, and works on literary criticism.[6]

In addition to literary works, in the 1960s the magazine covered articles on Soviet films, focusing on the merits of these movies.[7] Mikhail Antonov's a seminal essay, "So What Is Happening to Us?", was published in Oktyabr in 1989.[14]

In 1989, the magazine published a posthumous work, Forever Flowing, by Vasily Grossman,[15] arguing "Lenin - all victories of the party and the state are linked with the name of Lenin. But all cruelty committed in the country has become the tragic burden of Vladimir Ilych."[4] The article was written long before, but it was one of the first overt criticisms against Lenin.[4] Thus, it marked a serious challenge process towards the past of the country, especially Lenin's legacy.[15]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bill Keller (28 January 1988). "Notes on the Soviet Union". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. 2.0 2.1 Anna Aslanyan (8 April 2011). "Revolutions and resurrections: How has Russia's literature changed?". The Independent. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. 3.0 3.1 Gleb Struve (1951). Soviet Russian Literature, 1917-50. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles> – via Questia (subscription required)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 John-Thor Dahlburg (28 June 1989). "Magazine Prints Extraordinary Attack on Lenin". Associated Press. Moscow. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Rosalind J. Marsh (1986). Soviet Fiction Since Stalin: Science, Politics and Literature. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-389-20609-5.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Ekaterina Zamataeva (27 April 2013). "The Representation of Soviet Poetry in Postwar Decade in the Literary Journal "Oktyabr"" (PDF). Ellison Center. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. 7.0 7.1 The Soviet Government and the Jews 1948-1967. CUP Archive. p. 113. GGKEY:025L2PAP9T5. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Yitzhak M Brudny (30 June 2009). Reinventing Russia: Russian Nationalism and the Soviet State, 1953-1991. Harvard University Press. p. 198. ISBN 978-0-674-02896-8.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. Book Launch Party for Autobiography of a Corpse by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky Read Russia. 2013. Retrieved 31 December 2013.
  10. "Read Russia events". Academica Rossica. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. The Oktyabr magazine the Writer Andrey Bitov will award Andrey Bitov and Leonid Heifetz Ru paper. 25 December 2013. Retrieved 31 December 2013.
  12. Ilya Levin (October 1979). "Soviet Writing". Commentary Magazine. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  13. "Vasili Aksyonov". IMDb. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. Leon Aron (20 June 2011). "Everything you think you know about the collapse of the Soviet Union is wrong". American Enterprise Institute. Retrieved 4 October 2013.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. 15.0 15.1 Geoffrey A. Hosking (1991). The Awakening of the Soviet Union. Harvard University Press. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-674-05551-3.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>