Rate-Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line

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Rate-adaptive digital subscriber line (RADSL) is a pre-standard asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) solution.[1] RADSL was introduced as proprietary technology by AT&T Paradyne, later GlobeSpan Technologies Inc.,[2] in June 1996.[3] In September 1999, RADSL technology was formally described by ANSI in T1.TR.59-1999.[4][5] RADSL supports downstream data rates of up to approximately 8 Mbit/s, upstream data rates up to approximately 1 Mbit/s, and can coexist with POTS voice on the same line.[5]

RADSL allows rate-adaptation while the connection is in operation — rate-adaptation during connection setup is possible in many other DSL variants, including G.dmt and its successors. Rate-adaptation while the connection is in operation is specified as an option in ADSL2, ADSL2+, and VDSL2, under the name seamless rate adaptation (SRA).[6]

Technology

RADSL specifies two alternative modulation schemes, quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and carrierless amplitude phase modulation (CAP).[1][5] RADSL is not interoperable with discrete multi-tone (DMT) modulation variants of ADSL, standardized in ANSI T1.413 Issue 2 and G.dmt (G.992.1).[5] Upstream and downstream are frequency-division duplexed, the upstream and downstream transmit PSD masks are identical to those in ANSI T1.413.[5]

In RADSL, the baud rate, center frequency, and constellation size of the downstream and upstream channels can be adjusted while the connection is in operation.[7] Using this technique the line is more tolerant of errors caused by noise and signal loss. As the parameters are adjusted, the bandwidth may be markedly decreased if there is a large amount of line noise or signal degradation.

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Vladimir Oksman (2 August 2004). "Fundamentals of Single-Carrier Modulation". In Philip Golden; Hervé Dedieu; Krista S. Jacobsen (eds.). Fundamentals of DSL Technology. CRC Press. p. 144. ISBN 978-0-203-31749-5.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "GlobeSpan Emerges From the Former AT&T Paradyne as a Separate Technology Licensing Business". PR Newswire. 1996-08-20. Retrieved 2014-03-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. "AT&T Paradyne Announces High-Speed Modem Technology". New York Times. 1996-06-04. Retrieved 2014-03-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. "T1.TR.59-1999 - Single-Carrier Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line (RADSL)". ANSI. September 1999. Retrieved 2014-03-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 "Technical Report No. 59 - Single-Carrier Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line (RADSL)" (PDF). ANSI. September 1999. Retrieved 2014-03-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. "TR-197 - DQS: DSL Quality Management Techniques and Nomenclature" (PDF). Broadband Forum. August 2012. p. 29-30. Retrieved 2014-03-06.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. "Technical Report No. 59 - Single-Carrier Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line (RADSL)" (PDF). ANSI. September 1999. p. 104-105. Retrieved 2014-03-06. |chapter= ignored (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>