Stockton Street Historic District

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Stockton Street Historic District
File:StocktonStHistoricDistrictHightstown.jpg
Stockton Street Historic District is located in Mercer County, New Jersey
Stockton Street Historic District
Location 126-326 Stockton Street, 219-237 Rogers Avenue, Hightstown, New Jersey
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Area 14.35 acres (5.81 ha)
Built 1830-1915
Architect Multiple
Architectural style Queen Anne, Gothic, Italianate, Federal, Colonial
NRHP Reference # 05001331
NJRHP # 4447[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 25, 2005
Designated NJRHP May 13, 2005

The Stockton Street Historic District covers both sides of Stockton Street (County Route 571), from Railroad Avenue to Summit Street, and a portion of Rogers Avenue in Hightstown, New Jersey. It is notable for its Victorian homes, First Methodist Church, and the Hightstown Civil War monument. It is also significant for its association with the introduction of rail service to New Jersey, as the first railroad in the United States to connect two major cities, New York and Philadelphia, originally ran along what is now Railroad Avenue at the eastern end of the district. In 1832, the John Bull, the first locomotive in the country, provided the first steam-powered passenger rail service in the country, stopping at Stockton Street.[2] In July 2015, HIghtstown became a Preserve America community which enhances historic preservation, including the district.[3]

See also

References

  1. "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places — Mercer County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection — Historic Preservation Office. January 22, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Kalmis, Kenneth (June 1, 2004). "Stockton Street Historic District" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. http://www.nj.com/mercer/index.ssf/2015/07/which_nj_town_did_michelle_obama_name_a_preserve_a.html#incart_river

External links