Genderism

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core
Jump to: navigation, search

Genderism, or gender binarism, is the social system or cultural belief that gender is a binary, or that there are, or should be, only two gendersman and woman — and that the aspects of one's gender are inherently linked to the sex in which they were assigned at birth and is strictly decided by the biology of the individual. These aspects may include expectations of dressing, behavior, sexual orientation, names/pronouns, preferred restroom, or any other quality attributed to their birth gender's representation, feminine or masculine.[1] These expectations may reinforce negative attitudes, bias, and discrimination towards people who display expressions of gender variance or nonconformity and/or whose gender identity is incongruent with their birth sex. In other words, discrimination is common among persons who do not identify as cisgender, or in congruence with sex assigned at birth.[2] Genderism is of particular relevance to individuals who fall within the transgender spectrum, and is the overarching ideology responsible for transphobia and trans bashing.[3] In addition, much like how transphobia is parallel to homophobia, genderism is said to be parallel to heterosexism,[4][5][6][7] or the belief that heterosexuality is the superior or more desirable sexual orientation in comparison to homosexuality, bisexuality, asexuality, etc. Heteronormativity, the ideology that these two genders and heterosexual orientation are the social norm, also contributes to the rigid social constructs put in place for gender identity and sexuality. Gender binarism, like heterosexism, denies or ignores the existence of gender identities that do not fall in either of the two accepted categories: man and woman [8]

See also

References

  1. "Beyond the Binary: Gender Identity Activism in Your School" (PDF). GSA Network. GSA Network. Summer 2010. Retrieved October 24, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. McGeeney, Ester; Harvey, Laura (2015). The Palgrave Handbook of the Psychology of Sexuality and Gender. Palgrave Handbooks. pp. 149–162. |access-date= requires |url= (help)<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Transgender and Transsexual Identities: The Next Strange Fruit— Hate Crimes, Violence and Genocide Against the Global TransCommunities, Jeremy D. Kidd & Tarynn M. Witten, Journal of Hate Studies [Vol.6:31. June 2008] 31-63.
  4. Shirley R. Steinberg (1 April 2009). Diversity and Multiculturalism: A Reader. Peter Lang. pp. 229–230. ISBN 978-1-4331-0345-2. Retrieved 10 September 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Genny Beemyn; Susan R. Rankin (1 November 2011). The Lives of Transgender People. Columbia University Press. pp. 89–90. ISBN 978-0-231-51261-9. Retrieved 10 September 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Derald Wing Sue (26 July 2010). Microaggressions and Marginality: Manifestation, Dynamics, and Impact. John Wiley & Sons. p. 224. ISBN 978-0-470-49139-3. Retrieved 11 September 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. The Psychology Of Prejudice And Discrimination. ABC-CLIO. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-275-98234-8. Retrieved 11 September 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. "Fact and Information Sheet About: Heterosexism" (PDF). James Madison University. Retrieved October 24, 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>